BMW design boss, Chris Bangle talks us through the manufacturer's revolutionaryconcept car
10 June 2008

BMW’s design director talks us around the revolutionary GINA concept, a car which can change its shape according to condition of speed.The GINA was actually created in 2001, but BMW has just shown it to the world for the first time – the company admitting that it’s radical design has influenced the look of several of its current cars.Let us know what you think…

 

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7

10 June 2008

I love this car! I really hope BMW will put it into production. If it its reasonably priced and handles well (the Z8 platform wasn't that good) I want to put a deposit.

14 June 2008

I really like the shapes Bangle come up with,but I don't think the idea of a fabric body will ever be practicable for cars - too many things could be done to it by lowlifes - imagine the fun they could have with a key !

14 June 2008

I've never like Mr Bangles designs or solutions to design problems.

The BMW 7 Series is a prime example of a car that has many clever ideas, but few like them. What saves it is it's nice to drive. Too much of it looks like afterthought after afterthough. Though the 5 Series looks less Banglish.

His designs are merely subjective answers to objective problems.

14 June 2008

Which is why he is one of the Worlds top designers and earning a fortune. Better than recycling the same old 'X' design for 25 years and calling it Classic. I think the board at BMW may think the opposite to you when they view their sales figures!! I agree that to the UK eye some designs are challenging but so many are copied now in one form or another.The GINA is a concept as were Aluminium bodied cars. I recall the press saying how they would never happen because they were too expensive to produce and repair.

14 June 2008

Theirs is a Retail Sales decision, not one of car design.

14 June 2008

Absolutely fantastic. The video. Great. Love the blinking eye. Fantastic. Did I say that?

Putting ALL practical considerations aside a moment: it's a great idea. If the car's changes of shape increase its effectiveness and efficiency, then there is no reason why they are not practical. And if its true it can still maintain safety standards, again it is no less practical. I'm sure future generations could even have a mix of carbon weave, making it flexible AND tough. It's good they're exploring different ways of doing so much. Along with the advances in engineering, it's a positive look at future potentials. Wow. I think I'm sold.


Would I buy one? Tell you when it's on sale.

15 June 2008

With the greatest respect, did we see the same video and Autocar Frontcover?

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