If electric power compels manufacturers to equip their cars with interiors like the Nissan Leaf’s, you will find absolutely no complaints from us.

Although relatively conventional in its layout, in light grey the Leaf’s cabin is bright, airy and cheerful. Perceived quality is high; the feel of the switchgear and materials is first rate at the Leaf’s money. It’s a large improvement on the 2013 models, with got an even tighter build and the option of a matt black interior finish.

Matt Burt

Matt Burt

Executive Editor, Autocar
The Leaf’s cabin is a pleasant place to be and, predictably, very refined

The driving position is set modestly high (those batteries are in the floor, after all) but ergonomically it is sound. The pedals are well spaced and, although the steering wheel wouldn’t suffer from a higher vertical range of movement, all of our testers easily found a comfortable driving position.

A split-level display, with speedo above the steering wheel and ancillary gauges behind, is clear. The depth and clarity of information just falls on the right, comprehensive side of fussy.

In the dashboard’s centre sits the rest of the IT systems, comprising 
sat-nav, entertainment and vehicle monitoring systems, which are as comprehensive as you’d want. They include the possibility of sending the car’s charging status remotely to an App on your mobile smartphone, which can also be used to, among other options, remotely engage the air conditioning. Most useful during driving, however, is the screen of gauges that display how much energy is being used by the drive motor, and ancillary power drains, separately.

The rest of the Leaf’s interior is as conventional as any small family car’s. Rear legroom is fine, headroom is tight only for those over six feet tall, and the boot is an average size. It’s also a very quiet cabin. Refinement levels from the motor are, as you’d expect, supremely quiet, but wind rush and road noise are also commendably subdued.

Aside from deciding whether you want the 120 mile range 24kWh or 155 mile range 30kWh Nissan Leaf in your life, there is also three trim levels to choose from too - Visia, Acenta and Tekna. Opting for the entry-level Visia model will comprehensively equip your car with luxuries such as - air conditioning, keyless entry and go, Bluetooth preparation and a USB port, while upgrading to the Acenta allows you to opt between both power outputs, but also comes with 16in alloy wheels, a reversing camera and NissanConnect, which includes an EV telematics system, info on the nearest charging systems and eco-routing.

Opt for the range-topping Tekna trim and the Leaf gets heated seats all round, a heated steering wheel, Bose sound system, 360-degree camera and a leather interior.

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