Prototype production version of Project Nina revealed; sister car to Fisker Karma

This is the Fisker Atlantic luxury saloon, which will spearhead the company’s ambition to produce a four-door, £40,000 electric rival to the BMW 5-series. It has been revealed today at the New York motor show.

The car, known as Project Nina during most of its development, is angled as a model with more widespread appeal than Fisker’s first offering, the £80,000 Karma.

Company chief Henrik Fisker said that lessons learned from the production of the Karma had been incorporated into the new car’s development. “We launched Karma first to define what the brand was all about,” he said. “Obviously, Atlantic will sell in greater volumes, but we wanted to be known as a premium maker before introducing something cheaper.

“There’s nothing out there like Atlantic. Who says that you can’t have beauty in volume segments?”

Fisker is promising that the Atlantic’s interior will be “really special”. Three differently themed interior trim levels will be offered, from a sports-styled layout to a luxurious one aimed at female buyers.

A convertible version of the Atlantic is planned, and it is possible that the model could spawn a range of different body styles in the future. The car is also likely to be offered in right-hand drive.

The Atlantic uses a BMW engine as its range extender. It is said to be more refined than the GM-based engine in the Karma and, therefore, more in keeping with Fisker’s luxury brief.

The Atlantic is based on a new platform and is expected to go into production at Fisker’s Delaware plant in the autumn of 2013. This schedule could be pushed back, however, following Fisker’s recent funding dispute with the US Department of Energy.

The Atlantic is likely to go on sale before the Surf, which is the shooting brake variant of the Karma.

Fisker sources have also indicated that the Sunset — a convertible Karma concept unveiled in 2009 - is now unlikely to be produced.

Mark Tisshaw/Matt Burt

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Comments
14

2 April 2012

No interior shots, as yet, but would this car not make the Karma redundant, unless there is a significant performance and luxury difference? It certainly keeps the Karma's good looks and warm-fuzzy-eco-hero theme, which would account for a lot of the reason for wanting a Fisker.

2 April 2012

Both this and the Karma are lovely-looking cars and deserve to do very well.

I'm not sure about these body-coloured alloys, though. Perhaps they are on the options list, allowing one to choose a slightly more sober-looking set.

2 April 2012

[quote mrcliodCi] more sober[/quote] The times you will get pulled over for a check driving this will increase considerably !!!

As for the car - IF they can keep it under 40k without a daft neccessary options list yes it will sell very well and it is a hansome brute - just a tad too BMW on the face

2 April 2012

[quote petrolheadinrussia]it is a hansome brute - just a tad too BMW on the face[/quote]

BMW wishes their cars looked this good!

2 April 2012

[quote disco.stu]BMW wishes their cars looked this good![/quote]

Sorry, grammar Nazis. I just realised that I combined singular and plural incorrectly. My apologies.

2 April 2012

Yes that's lush, I will have the convertible version if possible please.

2 April 2012

1: How will they make this with a BMW engine as a range extender for £40k when the Volt costs that much?

2: Will it ever go into production as Fisker is in dispute over it's funding with the US department of energy?

2 April 2012

Looks great. Strong eco credentials. Practical. Want.

2 April 2012

Show off a lovely prototype and get people salivating. Check.

Establish factory in area of high unemployment. Check.

Make amazing promises/projections on price. Check.

Launch car into turbulent economic market. Check.

Get embroiled in funding issues. Check

Call me cynical but haven't we been here before - like about 30 years ago. In Belfast. Ah well, at least this time it's not our money. And it does look good too.

2 April 2012

[quote Autocar]This is the Fisker Atlantic luxury saloon, which will spearhead the company’s ambition to produce a four-door, £40,000 electric rival to the BMW 5-series.

The car, known as Project Nina during most of its development, is angled as a model with more widespread appeal than Fisker’s first offering, the £80,000 Karma.

Gallery: Fisker Atlantic

Company chief Henrik Fisker said that ...Read the full article[/quote] Cross between an Aston and a Maserati?,oh, and that price.......who but only the well off are going to afford to what all intend and purpose is an accessory purely on the price?,isn't it about time for cheap transport for the masses?

Peter Cavellini.

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