Currently reading: Roland Gumpert seeks industry support for Nathalie fuel cell EV
Gumpert "feels left alone by politics and the economy" and asks for support for mass production of methanol fuel cell sports car
Autocar-Felix-Page
News
2 mins read
18 June 2020

Roland Gumpert, the German-based brand backed by Chinese EV start-up Aiways, is seeking industry support to help realise its ambition to put the long-awaited Nathalie methanol fuel-cell sports EV into production.

The firm, led by the renowned ex-Audi engineer of the same name, had planned to build 500 examples of the Nathalie, with deliveries proposed for early 2021. However, it is likely the economic impact of the Covid-19 pandemic has thrown up significant road blocks. 

"We feel left alone by politics and the economy," Gumpert said in a statement. "We are looking for powerful partners with whom we can spread this new, ground-breaking technology. We can also imagine participation from the federal or state governments."

"Our technology offers long ranges with short refuelling times, a simple infrastructure. [It] is CO2-neutral and completely harmless thanks to the use of green methanol," he said. "With the methanol fuel cell, we have managed to develop a safe energy concept from hydrogen. We generate electricity without risk and in an environmentally neutral way - and even less risky than any petrol-powered car."

Roland Gumpert has already secured a partner for the mass production of its methanol fuel cells: Danish firm Blue World Technologies. 

Once production starts, the first Nathalie models to be sold will be in €407,000 (£353,520) First Edition guise, which has a bespoke paint scheme. Revealed in prototype form in 2018, the Nathalie is equipped with a 15kW fuel cell that generates electricity by converting methanol to hydrogen. 

The cell sends power via a pair of synchronised two-speed gearboxes to four wheel-mounted electric motors that, with a combined output of 536bhp, propel the Nathalie from standstill to 62mph in 2.5sec and on to a claimed top speed of 186mph. 

The unusual choice of powertrain is said to allow greater ease of use, removing the need to visit specialist hydrogen fuelling stations and with a claimed refuelling time of three minutes – significantly less than even the fastest-charging conventional EV. Gumpert claims a range of over 500 miles between fill-ups. 

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The production car’s styling remains true to that of the 2018 concept. The thin headlight clusters, gaping air intakes and rakish, coupé-style silhouette remain, as does the downforce-enhancing rear spoiler.

However, the concept’s conventional doors have made way for Lamborghini-style scissor doors that are said to be more in keeping with the Nathalie’s "super-sport car genes". 

Although it is road legal, the Nathalie is prepared for track usage, with a full FIA-approved roll cage in place of a rear bench. Extensive use of materials such as flax and carbonfibre ensures maximum lightness.

Read more 

New Gumpert RG Nathalie fuel cell EV – details and first ride

Full of gas: 6 weeks with a hydrogen-powered car​

16 different fuels that could power your car​

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xxxx 18 June 2020

Going well then

So basically they want a world wide chain of methanol stations for a production run of 500 cars. Hydrogen failed on that front (among others) and had plans to sell more than 500.  Floored from the start, dump the fuel cell and stick a 60kwh battery in capable of v. fast charging  

typos1 18 June 2020

xxxx wrote:

xxxx wrote:

So basically they want a world wide chain of methanol stations for a production run of 500 cars. Hydrogen failed on that front (among others) and had plans to sell more than 500.  Floored from the start, dump the fuel cell and stick a 60kwh battery in capable of v. fast charging  

Remove your blinkers idiot - hydrogen has a future, its a fair way off but once we can harness the masses of free energy the sun gives us we ll be able to get it for free, so it early development has merit. Human development over millenia has involved trying out new tech, some is successful, some not and sometimes the not successful tech has led to other often unseen innovations - searching for mini black holes (and failing) gave us wifi for instance. Get back in your box and stop trolling.

xxxx 19 June 2020

Half wit troll and Muppethead that is typos

typos1 wrote:

xxxx wrote:

So basically they want a world wide chain of methanol stations for a production run of 500 cars. Hydrogen failed on that front (among others) and had plans to sell more than 500.  Floored from the start, dump the fuel cell and stick a 60kwh battery in capable of v. fast charging  

Remove your blinkers idiot - hydrogen has a future, its a fair way off but once we can harness the masses of free energy the sun gives us we ll be able to get it for free, so it early development has merit. Human development over millenia has involved trying out new tech, some is successful, some not and sometimes the not successful tech has led to other often unseen innovations - searching for mini black holes (and failing) gave us wifi for instance. Get back in your box and stop trolling.

You still think diesel is the answer to everything so you opinion counts for nothing.  Hydrogen cars have been in the future forever, and will stay there.  Remove your blinkers against BEVs and you might see the progress that has been made.

si73 5 March 2020

Interesting powertrain, would

Interesting powertrain, would be good to learn more about it and how actually viable it is. I'm assuming it's ridiculously expensive to manufacture and as such only suitable for cars in this price range.
Agree Peter it really does have echoes of nissan gtr about it.
Filippouy 4 March 2020

0 to 60 time

I wonder who needs to accelerate to 60mph in 2.5 seconds. Of course I understand and share car enthusiasm, but cars are also used in cities and towns, and this figures look like boy-racer magnets.

30-70 mph times seem way more relevant yet are almost never stated in model introductions.