Currently reading: Nissan Leaf 'from £24,000'
Industry source confirms price for new electric hatchback; price includes battery pack
Autocar
News
1 min read
10 May 2010

The Nissan Leaf will cost between £24,000 and £25,000 when it goes on-sale in the UK next year, according to an industry source.

This price includes the car's battery pack, which was expected to be available to lease only, and the government's £5000 incentive towards the cost of purchasing an electric car.

The car had been tipped to cost the same as a top-spec Toyota Prius, but it will come in around £2000 higher than the £22,609 Prius T Spirit. Final pricing and specification details will be announced within the next three weeks, although it is not clear whether there will be a cheaper Leaf available without a battery pack that can then be leased.

Demand is expected to outstrip supply for the initial batch of Leafs that will be built in Japan; the company has already had mote than 10,000 customers pay a small deposit as an expression of interest and a similar scheme will be launched in Europe this summer.

Each battery pack is said to have a life of between five and 10 years. Nissan will improve the technology all the time and as more Leafs are produced, the cost will come down. Nissan will break even on the Leaf in the first year and the car has been built to "make money", according to our source.

Production of the Leaf will commence at Sunderland in February 2013 and the plant will build 50,000 units per year on the same production line as the Note and Juke.

Mark Tisshaw

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lilianna 4 April 2014

Of course this is not a

Of course this is not a Vauxhall or even an Opel, but a rebadged Diawoo in its entirety. As such it is not bad
hedgecreep 11 May 2010

Re: Nissan Leaf 'from £24,000'

nicksheele wrote:

hedgecreep wrote:
as usual, brummy boy

get it right. 'Brummie'. It would be like me incorrectly spelling 'City worker' 'parasite'. No, wait.

Oxford Dictionary:

Brummie (also Brummy) Brit. informal

• noun a person from Birmingham.

• adjective 1 Brit. relating to Birmingham. 2 (brummy) Austral./NZ counterfeit, showy, or cheaply made.

you know, i think i prefer the antipodean definition (^:

Rover P6 3500S 11 May 2010

Re: Nissan Leaf 'from £24,000'

beachland2 wrote:

Rover P6 3500S wrote:
The Hydrogen Fuel Cell will never work, because splitting hydrogen from oxygen in water cannot be done on the car, and, off the car, it's a very energy-intensive, eco-unfriendly process. For now, the gas turbine range extender hybrid is the future.

It doesnt matter how energy intenstive it is to get hold of the hydrogen to pump into a cars fuel tank to be used in a fuel cell to create electricity and water. what matters is the cost of hydrogen.

In all shell garages that have hydrogen pumps for cars they are free to use, yes no charge at all. When the fuel is costed the average is about the equivalent of 40p a litre, this is rough at the moment though as there is no standardised retail structure on pricing.

so anyway to conclude energy costs of obtaining hydrogen are irrelevant. i'm not sure what uk fuel duty would be on that, cheaper than petrol/diesel though, and would provide zero tailpipe pollutants.

Beachy, please, stop putting such huge gaps at the end of your posts! =)

Now, let's actually address the points you've made.

beachland2 wrote:
It doesnt matter how energy intenstive it is to get hold of the hydrogen to pump into a cars fuel tank to be used in a fuel cell to create electricity and water. what matters is the cost of hydrogen.

Obviously, the cost of hydrogen matters, but the environmental impact of hydrogen production also matters. That's like saying all that matters for an EV is the cost of the electricity with which you charge the battery, and to hell with all the coal that's being burned to produce the electricity. Nonsense. Whether or not you believe in climate change, or the relationship between it and CO2 emissions (I do believe in climate change, but I'm not 100% convinced of the CO2 link), no-one can deny that minimising the burning of coal and minimising our energy usage is a good thing. Clean air is good for everyone.

beachland2 wrote:
In all shell garages that have hydrogen pumps for cars they are free to use, yes no charge at all. When the fuel is costed the average is about the equivalent of 40p a litre, this is rough at the moment though as there is no standardised retail structure on pricing.

Yeah, but, if hydrogen cars achieve mainstream popularity, then how long d'you think BP are going to keep giving hydrogen away? Right now, they're only doing it because the Government gives them tax breaks for doing so, trying to encourage people to get into hydrogen cars. It's in Shell's long-term interest to do so, as they can start selling it at a profit sooner if people get into hydrogen cars, and it's in the Government's interest as well, as they can start taxing hydrogen too.

beachland2 wrote:
so anyway to conclude energy costs of obtaining hydrogen are irrelevant. i'm not sure what uk fuel duty would be on that, cheaper than petrol/diesel though, and would provide zero tailpipe pollutants.

Tailpipe emissions and fuel duty aren't all that matters. There are other important considerations.

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