First images of new four-seater that will be arriving in the UK in late 2008
22 March 2007

This is our first glance at the all-new Infiniti G37 coupe, due to be unveiled at the New York motor show in April.

If you haven’t paid much attention to Infiniti before, you should: you’ll be able to buy a right-hand-drive version of this 3.7-litre V6-powered four-seater coupe in the UK late in 2008.

What’s more, with two turbochargers attached, the G37 forms the basis of the much-anticipated new Skyline GT-R.

Inifniti – Nissan’s luxury equivalent of Toyota’s Lexus – has been around in the US for years, but it’s only due to come to Europe in 2008. The previous-generation G37 was a big seller in the US, where this new version goes on sale in August 2007.

Going on the form of the previous car – and Nissan’s excellent 350Z – we can expect the 330bhp G37 to be good to drive, though it will be more luxurious than its two-seat Nissan sibling. Four-wheel active steering should help.

Expect the interior to be a leather-swathed technology-fest, with a hard-disc based Bose audio system, sat-nav and a rear-view monitor all available.

Inifiniti obviously hasn’t released any prices yet, but we reckon it will start at over £30,000.

The G37 will be joined in Europe by three other brand-new models: a new BMW X3-sized crossover 4x4 (due to be unveiled alongside the G37 at New York), its full-sized SUV sibling the FX45, and a BMW 3-series-challenging small executive saloon. We’re looking forward to driving the lot of them.

Join the debate

Comments
1

15 February 2009

Before bothering to mis-inform the public Autocar should try to get their facts straight. 1. The G37 is NOT the basis for a Skyline GT-R. It is called the Skyline in Japan. It is NOT the NISSAN GT-R that is sold in the US or the UK. 2. The G37 is not avaiable with turbo-chargers. 3. The rotary seat heater knobs are the same as the 2008 US model, as are the interior materials. 4. The "previous-generation" G37 was not a G37, it was a G35. As for higher speed driving in Europe... maybe, but petrol prices really preclude driving in any manner other than sedate in cash-strapped Britain and Europe. I have owned and driven many British and American cars, German, Domestic (except for British cars as they don't make any) and Japanese. I have also ownded and driven these cars in both the US and the UK In every case the interior of the US version has been better than those of the UK, again, mostly due to the fact that British people do not have the disposable income that most other industrialized countries have, so the cars have to be made with less expensive materials. I own a G35X and a G37S and can tell you that these cars are only considered a step above the standard car that most people buy in the US, it is NOT considered to be in the "luxury' range as it is in Britain. The G37 is approximately 42% higher in cost in the UK versus the US. So the next time Autocar tries to mislead you, just read some other reviews before making your choice. Then you will be an informed buyer, as opposed to a mis-informed buyer.

Add your comment

Log in or register to post comments

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week

  • Skoda-Karoq 2.0 TDI 4x4
    First Drive
    16 October 2017
    Diesel version of Skoda’s junior SUV is unobtrusive and undemanding, but we’d still go for the silkier petrol version of the Karoq
  • Audi Q7 e-tron
    First Drive
    16 October 2017
    Expensive and flawed but this understated diesel-electric Audi Q7 has a lot to offer
  • Citroën C3
    First Drive
    16 October 2017
    Is the third gen Citroën C3 ‘fresh and different’ enough to take on its supermini rivals? We spend six months with one to find out
  • BMW X3
    First Drive
    15 October 2017
    A satisfying rework of the X3 that usefully improves its handling, cabin finish, space and connectivity to make this BMW a class front-runner again
  • Vauxhall Insignia Country Tourer
    First Drive
    13 October 2017
    Off-road estate is now bigger, more spacious and available with torque-vectoring all-wheel drive, but is it enough to make its German rivals anxious?