Currently reading: Fiat 500 and Panda: UK pricing for mild hybrids announced
Two city cars become brand's first electrified models before the launch of the electric Fiat 500e
Rachel Burgess
News
2 mins read
8 January 2020

Mild hybrid versions of the Fiat 500 and Fiat Panda will be priced from £12,665 and £13,885 respectively when they go on sale shortly.

The city cars become the first electrified models in the Fiat line-up, ahead of the new electric 500e arriving later this year.

The pair, due to arrive in February and March respectively, use a mild hybrid powertrain that Fiat claims reduces CO2 emissions by up to 30%. The 500 Mild Hybrid emits 88g/km of CO2 and the Panda Mild Hybrid emits 89g/km of CO2.

Replacing the 1.2-litre petrol engine, the new powertrain comprises a 1.0-litre three-cylinder petrol engine, a 12V belt-driven electric motor and a lithium ion battery. It produces 69bhp and 69lb ft of torque.

The belt-integrated starter motor system is mounted on the engine and recovers energy during braking and deceleration, which is then used to restart the engine in stop/start mode and to assist acceleration. It also allows the engine to switch off by shifting the gearbox into neutral at speeds below 18mph.

The models use a six-speed manual gearbox that's “aimed at improving fuel economy in out-of-town driving” and lowers the power unit by 45mm. Fiat says this allows the cars to “behave better on the road, thanks to the lower centre of gravity”.

The arrival of the 500 and Panda mild hybrids will begin with Launch Edition models. These feature an ‘H’ logo, green paint and Seaqual recycled plastic upholstery, of which 90% originates from land and 10% from the sea. The 500 Launch Edition costs £16,795, while the Panda equivalent costs £14,385.

Fiat has been slow to adopt electrification but plans to bounce back this year with the 500e. The plan is to continue selling the existing 500 – which was launched 13 years ago – alongside it.

Other Fiat models on the way include the 500 Giardiniera estate, a new 500X compact SUV and a Tipo replacement that's likely to be an SUV.

The Italian brand also hopes that its imminent merger with the PSA Group will further accelerate its electrification plans.

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19

8 January 2020

When I bought a Panda last year I commented to the salesman that the simple cars are all dying out. Indeed this is true of the Panda. The current version is wonderfully uncomplicated, 8V normally aspirated engine. Few electronics to go haywire. I've no doubt this new Panda will be better in a number of ways but I know which version I'd rather have when the warranty runs out. Three Pandas now in ten years and not a single fault in any of them.

8 January 2020

These cars are now ancient! They badly need updating and modernised.

8 January 2020
superstevie wrote:

These cars are now ancient! They badly need updating and modernised.

 

Ludicrous and wholly unnecessary opinion to hold. By not facelifting every few years and offering older tech, enables buyers in many regions to afford a great little, versatile, low running cost car. Italian buyers favour smaller cars for many reasons and Panda/500 do them proud.

 

Seems it is you who needs a facelift.

8 January 2020
Who's to say I haven't had one already? I'm a gay man hitting 40 after all....

10 January 2020
Takeitslowly wrote:

superstevie wrote:

These cars are now ancient! They badly need updating and modernised.

 

Ludicrous and wholly unnecessary opinion to hold. By not facelifting every few years and offering older tech, enables buyers in many regions to afford a great little, versatile, low running cost car. Italian buyers favour smaller cars for many reasons and Panda/500 do them proud.

 

Seems it is you who needs a facelift.

Ludicrous! Absolutely ludicrous... I'll say it again, LUDICROUS!

Is it time time for tea? My winkle hurts from spending too much time on Pornhub. Where's XXXX? I need to spread some hate.

8 January 2020
superstevie wrote:

These cars are now ancient! They badly need updating and modernised.

Fiat have always had a habit of making cars that stand the test of time from a design perspective. Sure, the 500 and Panda could do with some updated safety tech and a bit more space in the 500, but that's about it. There's a reason why they still sell so well. 

8 January 2020
Yes really. They're quite far behind now, and have been for some time. The 500 is a 13 year-old car now. I don't mind the looks, I think they've aged fairly well, but I'm disappointed that rather than giving us a new car, they put a new engine in instead. It will be interesting to see what happens next now they've merged with PSA.

9 January 2020
The PSA never will prove interesting as I imagine future fiats being based on PSA cars, but I agree with others that the basic 500 and panda are great, yes the panda needed the safety kit already in the 500 for a better ncap result but the cars still drive well compared with other city cars and are as spacious, the 1.2 500 is a fantastic little thing and they seem to still hold their value well used.

9 January 2020
si73 wrote:

The PSA never will prove interesting as I imagine future fiats being based on PSA cars, but I agree with others that the basic 500 and panda are great, yes the panda needed the safety kit already in the 500 for a better ncap result but the cars still drive well compared with other city cars and are as spacious, the 1.2 500 is a fantastic little thing and they seem to still hold their value well used.

Auto correct, did read merger not never when I typed.

9 January 2020
Mini2 wrote:

superstevie wrote:

These cars are now ancient! They badly need updating and modernised.

Fiat have always had a habit of making cars that stand the test of time from a design perspective. Sure, the 500 and Panda could do with some updated safety tech and a bit more space in the 500, but that's about it. There's a reason why they still sell so well. 

A bit like chips, they such cheap discounted cars you need to shift huge numbers to make any profit at all, as to the rest of the FIAT range, emmm

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