Comapny to consider fitting ESP as standard on all vehicles
27 April 2010

Citroen is to consider fitting ESP as standard on more of its vehicles, after its Nemo Multispace failed the so-called 'elk test'.

The testing, conducted by the German Automobile Association (ADAC) and Which?, involved driving the Nemo Multispace through an emergency obstacle avoidance manoeuvre at 50mph.

During the test, the car rolled over onto its roof.

A Citroen spokesman confirmed the incident, but cautioned that the elk test doesn't reflect real world driving conditions. "Our test procedures conducted in development reflect real-life avoidance tests combined with normal driving reactions," he said. "The elk test is extremely severe."

The spokesman confirmed that the 'elk test' wouldn't be a standard part of Citroen's testing procedures, despite its notoriety within the industry.

Peugeot confirmed that its Bipper Tepee would share the same handling characteristics as the Nemo, although it was not tested by ADAC for safety reasons. The Fiat Qubo, which is also based on the same platform, passed the test with a model fitted with ESP, but was not tested without it.

PSA, the parent company of Peugeot-Citroen, has responded by announcing it will fit ESP to both the Nemo and Bipper as standard by autumn 2011 at the latest.

At present, ESP is not available on any Nemos or Bippers, and as a cost option on diesel-powered Qubos.

The Citroen spokesman confirmed that the company would review its policy on ESP, which is not fitted to some models in its range, or is offered as a cost-option only.

"It is clearly an issue we are aware of and considering," he said.

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27 April 2010

I think it does reflect real world driving conditions. Just because something might not be as large as an elk/moose how many country roads might you have a decent stretch where you're doing 50mph and a deer runs out in front of you? Hit a deer and you can do yourself serious damage, as well as writing off your car (especially if you lose control after hitting it). Being able to steer hard in one direction then another in the avoidance of a large mammal is incredibly important in some places - you hit a moose/elk with your car and it walks away while the medical services sponge what's left of you out of your car. Rolling on your roof is only marginally the lesser of two evils.

27 April 2010

Was the Elk OK?

27 April 2010

Surely skinnier tyres with less grip , or a stronger front anti-roll bar to induce more understeer would be better ways of getting the Nemo past the elk test. Electronic stability controls can fail after 2 or 3 years , and this would leave elks very vulnerable.

27 April 2010

[quote theonlydt]I think it does reflect real world driving conditions. Just because something might not be as large as an elk/moose how many country roads might you have a decent stretch where you're doing 50mph and a deer runs out in front of you? Hit a deer and you can do yourself serious damage, as well as writing off your car (especially if you lose control after hitting it). [/quote]

I live by Cannock Chase, a big forest which I drive through most days & often late at night. I see deer in the road on almost a daily basis. I do drive safely & look out for them but even doing 30mph a deer can dart out from behind a bush, & I have had to slam the brakes on a few times to avoid them.

However in my opinion this "Elk test" is quite irrelevant, it is held on a flat surface, on the country lanes I drive down there are cambers to the road, ditches at the sides, it would be very easy to flip any car over if you swerved to avoid a deer, ESP or no ESP. I dont think Citroen should be too concerned & I dont really think ESP is necessary on a car like the Citroen Nemo, although Im sure people will disagree with me on this.

currently a happy owner of a Mitsubishi Shogun Pinin :)

27 April 2010

Most drivers would fail the elk test, regardless of their car's capabilities!

27 April 2010

[quote roverfan1984]I dont think Citroen should be too concerned & I dont really think ESP is necessary on a car like the Citroen Nemo, although Im sure people will disagree with me on this.[/quote]

I had my butt saved by ESP this winter so I wouldn't buy any car without it, especially any car with a high centre of gravity.

27 April 2010

[quote roverfan1984]However in my opinion this "Elk test" is quite irrelevant, it is held on a flat surface, on the country lanes I drive down there are cambers to the road, ditches at the sides, it would be very easy to flip any car over if you swerved to avoid a deer, ESP or no ESP.[/quote] I used to have the same opinion, but having tried to tip (it was a driver demonstration) a loaded Merc Sprinter van with a high, uneven load I was impressed at the fact it just wouldn't roll. I was a bit tentative at first, then really went for it off camber, fast, sharp movements and it just went where you put it. It was Merc showing off their new ESP or whatever they call it, but the way they don't just cut power, but also apply individual brakes etc means I'd now trust good ESP over almost any road surface. [quote roverfan1984] I see deer in the road on almost a daily basis. I do drive safely & look out for them but even doing 30mph a deer can dart out from behind a bush, & I have had to slam the brakes on a few times to avoid them.[/quote] You need our "road safe" deer. They're so numerous over here and so confident that no-one will kill them with anything other than a car that they've become incredibly bold - last night there were nine in my back garden and in the morning three of them were just across the street, 3m from cars and the house grazing away. Roads, however, they've got smart. One of them stands at the side, waits for the traffic to ease, it then stands in the middle of the road while all the ones waiting in the ditch cross, before heading of itself. All we need now is to give the crossing guard a high vis vest! (Black-tailed deer are a bit bigger than most UK deer, they'll make a proper mess of your car)

27 April 2010

Is it the same with Elk that if you kill one in a car, its only the next car along that can legally eat it?

27 April 2010

[quote FriendlyFisherman]Is it the same with Elk that if you kill one in a car, its only the next car along that can legally eat it?[/quote] Pffft. You hit a 300kg+ elk, your bonnet will take its legs out - guess where the body is going? Yep, through the windscreen... All 300kg+ of it. Elk? Gets up, walks off.

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