New battery plant in Michigan will make Ampera packs
14 August 2009

The batteries for the Vauxhall Ampera are to be built at a new factory in Michigan.

General Motors has revealed plans to create the £23m facility where it will also make the lithium ion cells for the Ampera’s sister car, the Chevrolet Volt.

"Developing and producing advanced batteries is a key step in GM's journey to become the leader in electric vehicles," said GM's chief executive Fritz Henderson.

GM will lease the building and once the plant is fully operational it estimates that 70,000 battery packs can be produced per year.

It is hoped that production can begin at the end of 2010 to support the Volt, which is due for release shortly after that date.

GM has not yet revealed where the Ampera itself will be built. Unlike the Volt, it will be made in Europe, with the UK and Germany the leading contenders to land the deal.

The Vauxhall Ampera is expected to go on sale in the UK in 2012.

Twitter - follow autocar.co.ukSee all the latest Vauxhall reviews, news and video

Add your comment

Log in or register to post comments

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week

  • Skoda-Karoq 2.0 TDI 4x4
    First Drive
    16 October 2017
    Diesel version of Skoda’s junior SUV is unobtrusive and undemanding, but we’d still go for the silkier petrol version of the Karoq
  • Audi Q7 e-tron
    First Drive
    16 October 2017
    Expensive and flawed but this understated diesel-electric Audi Q7 has a lot to offer
  • Citroën C3
    First Drive
    16 October 2017
    Is the third gen Citroën C3 ‘fresh and different’ enough to take on its supermini rivals? We spend six months with one to find out
  • BMW X3
    First Drive
    15 October 2017
    A satisfying rework of the X3 that usefully improves its handling, cabin finish, space and connectivity to make this BMW a class front-runner again
  • Vauxhall Insignia Country Tourer
    First Drive
    13 October 2017
    Off-road estate is now bigger, more spacious and available with torque-vectoring all-wheel drive, but is it enough to make its German rivals anxious?