EU to force 'costly' system on car makers by 2014
24 August 2009

European car makers could be forced to install technology which would automatically call emergency services in the event of a crash by 2014.

The eCall system is designed to save the lives of people who are unconscious or disorientated after an accident, and the European Commission is eager to make it mandatory in new cars.

However, its introduction has been held back due to concerns over costs, with five EU countries, including Britain and Ireland, refusing to commit.

"If the eCall rollout does not accelerate, the Commission stands ready to set out clear rules obliging governments, industry and emergency services to respond," said European Telecommunications Commissioner Viviane Reding.

“I want to see the first eCall cars on our roads next year.”

It is estimated that the system could save 2500 lives across Europe annually. No prices for the system were available.

Russell Campbell

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3

24 August 2009

I assume it will be triggered in the same sort of way as an airbag is (certain G force impact)?

I know numerous people that have had air bags go off in non accident situations (kerb clippings, pot holes etc), so are we going to end up with a service that is inundated with non urgent calls?

Who's paying for all this too? The car driver? You can bet it's not going to be a one off payment and there is some sort of subscription charge!

Have the EU got nothing better to do?

 

 

It's all about the twisties........

25 August 2009

BMW already have this as an option. Inside you have a button you can press in an emergency, but it will also initiate a call if it thinks you may not be able to.

Smart those BMWs..... The Efficient Dynamics I've got on my are very impressive too. Yet, there's no compromise. Others are playing catch up!

25 August 2009

[quote TegTypeR]Have the EU got nothing better to do?[/quote] Sadly, no. They have to keep coming up with new ideas to justify their existance. They rely on lobby groups for all sorts of bonkers ideas coming up with new things that they can put forward as yet more regulation to impose without any consultation. On the road safety front, someone somewhere (probably a non-driver) believes that motoring "accidents" can be eliminated altogether by loading cars with more and more technology and more and more "safety" equipment; the idea that lighter, smaller and simpler cars along with better driver education could achieve the same result while also contributing to the "green" solution of using less fuel, just does not occuer to them, it is too simple and they would be out of a job.


Enjoying a Fabia VRs - affordable performance

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