Drivers want cleaner cars but only if they’re still good to drive
24 October 2008

Drivers want more efficient, less polluting cars but only if they’re still good to drive, a BMW market research survey has reported.

“It’s all very well to offer more efficient products," said BMW marketing director Richard Hudson. "But unless the quality and performance also progress, they simply won’t sell.”

The German company acknowledges that modern motorists are opting for lower-emission vehicles, but believes most aren’t motivated by an environmental conscience.

BMW’s research showed that three-quarters of drivers would only purchase a lower-emission car if it saved them money.

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Comments
6

24 October 2008

Unfortunately in reality, there are two types of car buyer. The one that only buys what they want to drive (regardless of pollution etc) and the one who looks predominantly at costs.

The only people that push the subject of environmental motoring are the green campaigners and the governments. On the whole, the human species are a selfish bunch of so and so's.

 

 

It's all about the twisties........

25 October 2008

Quote "BMW’s research showed that three-quarters of drivers would only purchase a lower-emission car if it saved them money." Is it me or is this stating the obvious? Surely if a car has lower emissions, then it is more efficient, and therefore will consume less fuel. However, let's enter into the spirit of research. My own research shows that three-quarters of drivers would only purchase a larger car if it gave them more space. And two thirds of drivers would only purchase a larger engined car if it was faster. Even more amazingly, one fifth of drivers would only purchase a BMW if it was the last brand on earth, or if they lost that pert of their brain which is responsible for embarrassment.

25 October 2008

I think [quote noluddite]Surely if a car has lower emissions, then it is more efficient, and therefore will consume less fuel.[/quote]

Very true, but it may also cost much more to buy. The Chevy volt will use very little fuel, but it has an estimated purchase price of £35k for a focus class car. I think what BMW were getting at is that drivers won't spend more overall (including purchase and fuel cost) even if a car is better for the environment - it has to save them money overall.

Still pretty obvious to you and me - but apparently not to some government ministers or even car companies.

27 October 2008

Runflat tyres on BMW's-A very good friend of mine will not remplace his 320d this year with a new one as his tyres lasted about a third less than mine and cost 25% more to buy; We do the same mileage every year. We calculated that the extra financial gains in fuel consumtion have been lost in premature wear and extra replacement costs. So any considerations in perforamnce and costs must include all the little extras. Anyway, what they don't tell you is how many miles you must drive each year to generate any savings at all; Quite few few petrol cars are more fun to drive and cost less to run if you do say less then 15 or 20K miles per year. It would seem Diesel technolgy may reach a peak in development anyway. New petrol engine technolgy is on it's way and even BMW are working on this. However, until they get rid of the runflats...try something else!

27 October 2008

There is a simple solution, dont fit run flats again, which is what i plan to do.

28 October 2008

Firstly, I would just like to clarify that I do not work for, sell nor own a BMW; I am just fascinated by this brand.

What BMW is saying here may appear insulting to one's intelligence on the surface, but I think it's just BMW marketing trying too hard with disguised self-promotion and self-praise.

Desperate times call do for desperate measures and BMW needs to clutch at every straw (albeit in as subtle a way as possible) but they should not be castigated for it --- after all, they actually walk the talk --- I've lost count of how many awards thay have received for their engine technology and arent't they the number 1 luxury brand car manufacturer?

Global Automotive Sales have slumped and ALL Automotive Manufacturers are suffering --- BMW and TOYOTA included. Rising fuel prices and approaching CO2 restrictions are turning the global Automotive scene upside down!

Drivers clearly want "more efficient, less polluting cars" because they don't want to be slugged by new government-imposed penalties!

But at the same time, progress is progress and newer technology should be better in every sense of the word.

If I were buying a new car, I would expect both superior performance and superior fuel-efficiency and more than that, I'm not loyal to just the one brand. If a better car comes along by someone else, I'll convert without a second thought. (Come to think of it, I just bought a new car and it was a different brand because it did offer better performance and economy!)

To conclude, I wish BMW all the best possible success in the future, and although the future appears to be a difficult one, it is also a very exciting one!

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