Currently reading: Audi A3 returns 94.2mpg
New common-rail diesel model performs well in Audi test runs
Autocar
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1 min read
29 September 2009

Audi has been showing off how efficient its current range of models are in real-life conditions by running a selection for 4182km from Norway to Italy.

The Efficiency Challenge A to B runs from the village of A on the Norwegian Lofoten Islands to Bee in Northern Italy.

See the high-res Audi Efficiency Challenge A to B picture gallery

Audi has released interim results on how its models are performing, with the new A3 1.6 TDI coming out on top so far. Its emissions are 99g/km and it has managed a claimed 94.2mpg. By comparison, the S3 has returned 40mpg so far.

The Audi A4 2.0 TDI e, with CO2 emissions of 119g/km, has so far returned 72.4mpg, with the S4 model returning 36.7mpg.

Other models taking part include the new A5 Sportback 2.0 TFSI, which has managed 57.6mpg, and the Q7 V12 TDI, which has returned 32.5mpg.

The challenge runs over three legs – from A to Trondheim, Trondheim to Berlin and Berlin to Bee – and it will take in towns, villages, city centre, autobahns and the Alps. It is expected to end on 30 September.

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redstree 2 October 2009

Re: Audi A3 returns 94.2mpg

theonlydt wrote:
Scientifically the US are actually very backwards, still using measurements like the "British Thermal Unit", which not even the Brits use anymore! Generally in science we use SI units (with the odd exception), whereas consumers and the general public are quite happy to mix miles, litres, gallons, feet, centimetres, yards and metres.

This may be tipping my hand a little, but I can remember back in the 1950s having my teachers telling us that we all had to learn the English and the metric systems because the USA was going to be switching to the metric system in the near future. LIARS!!!!! I have never trusted teachers or the government since.

There is no good reason why the US has not switched, other than pure stubbornness. I still find the metric system much easier and more logical to work with. The decimal system versus fractions? One argument that I heard years ago is that auto mechanics would have to buy all new tools. Has anyone checked lately? You can not buy any car that does not have metric fastneres. Not Ford, not Chevy, they all have some metric and some english fastners. So, now the mechanics have to have both sets of tools. Guess it didn't work out so well trying to protect the mechanics from "un-needed" expenses.

Losing the satellite on Mars is not the only time that scientists have mixed systems and c**ked up. When the Hubble mirror was ground they used the wrong system and ground the wrong curvature into the main mirror. That required a major mission by the space shuttle, costing millions, to install "corrective" lenses. All because someone mixed up an inch for a centimeter.

Rant over.

theonlydt 30 September 2009

Re: Audi A3 returns 94.2mpg

Dan McNeil wrote:
we don't lose a 125 million dollar spacecraft. I'll say that for the yanks - when they c**k up, they c**k up big-time.

Ummm, short/selective memory... we managed to lose Beagle 2, which cost about £66m - so $125mish... Everyone makes mistakes.

Scientifically the US are actually very backwards, still using measurements like the "British Thermal Unit", which not even the Brits use anymore! Generally in science we use SI units (with the odd exception), whereas consumers and the general public are quite happy to mix miles, litres, gallons, feet, centimetres, yards and metres.

The fact still stands though that autocar tests vehicles (almost always) on sale in the UK market, with the majority of readers being from the UK. Customers like to compare mpg, partly because that compares to their old cars. The web domain address is .co.uk, so I think we should all just deal with whatever measurements the British public want right now. When I read car literature where I am fuel economy is quoted in l/100km - I just do a quick convert in my head and get on with it.

Dan McNeil 29 September 2009

Re: Audi A3 returns 94.2mpg

miecio wrote:
 You Brits are inconsistent with your measurement system, it's quite odd to me that you measure fuel efficiency in miles per galon, but CO2 emissions in grams per kilometer, why not per mile? Even stranger is giving a fuel tank capacity in litres, instead of galons, which makes calculation of car's range almost impossible without calculator. You should decide whether to use miles, galons, etc, or SI units (meters, kilograms)

At least when us Brits are inconsistent with our measurements we don't lose a 125 million dollar spacecraft. I'll say that for the yanks - when they c**k up, they c**k up big-time.

www.newscientist.com/article/mg16422070.900-schoolkid-blunder-brought-do...

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