Longer, lower, faster and lighter - new Cayman unveiled in Los Angeles
28 November 2012

The renewal of Porsche’s sportscar line up continues apace with the unveiling of a larger and lighter second-generation Cayman at the Los Angeles motor show.

The new mid-engined coupé adopts a redesigned platform offering improved weight distribution as well as a series of weight saving measures that are claimed to result in a lighter car than its predecessor.

Sister car to the Boxster, which it will be built with at Porsche’s Zuffenhausen factory (and eventually the old Karmann factory in Osnabruck), the new Cayman receives slightly different proportions in a move that serves to stretch its silhouette and provide the basis for a larger cabin. Length is up by 35mm, width extends by a scant 1mm while height drops by 10mm over its predecessor at 4380mm, 1801mm and 1295mm respectively.

The Cayman once again shares its styling with the Boxster. Distinguishing features include daytime running lights and indicators housed within a round unit, more pronounced rear haunches and a heavily angled liftback style tailgate at the rear.

As with its roadster sibling, the new coupé adopts an edgier appearance than its predecessor, with tauter surfacing and crisper lines, including a distinctive swage running through the doors and into larger cooling ducts ahead of the rear wheel arches. As part of Porsche's focus on weight saving, the body is predominantly aluminium. As on all recent Porsche models, the exterior mirrors are mounted on the doors rather than within the glasshouse. The wheelhouses have also increased in size, allowing Porsche to fit the range topping Cayman S with 19 inch wheels as standard and offer 20 inch rims as an option.

Inside, there is a higher quality interior with added levels of accommodation. The two seat layout remains, but a longer cabin provides greater levels of seat adjustment and improved storage. Porsche claims 150 litres of luggage space in the nose and a further 162 litres at the rear in the space above the engine.

As with the Boxster, the new Cayman will be sold with the choice of two flat six engines: a new 2.7-litre and a reworked version of the existing 3.4-litre. Buyers will also be able to choose between two gearboxes: a standard six speed manual or a seven speed dual clutch unit, which can idle the engine and disengage the clutch on a trailing throttle for to save fuel.

The 2.7-litre unit replaces the older 2.9-litre engine, producing an added 10bhp but 7lb ft less torque, with 275bhp and 214lb ft. It is sufficient to propel the  1310kg Cayman to 62mph in 5.7sec and up to a top speed of 165mph, while delivering a combined fuel consumption of 34.5mpg and  CO2 emissions of 192g/km, with the standard six-speed gearbox.  The dual clutch gearbox extends performance and reduces consumption and emissions, with official claims of 5.4sec, 164mph, 36.7mpg and 180g/km.

It will be joined from the outset by the reworked 3.4-litre engine. It delivers 5bhp more but the same level of torque as the old unit, with 325bhp at 7400rpm and 273lb ft at 4500rpm.  This is enough to endow the 1320kg Cayman S with an official 0-62mph time of 5.0sec in six-speed manual form and 4.7sec with the dual clutch gearbox, together with corresponding top speeds of 176mph and  175mph. Fuel consumption is put at 32.1mpg and 35.3mpg respectively for the two gearboxes, with corresponding CO2 emissions of 206g/km and 188g/km.

Underpinning the new Porsche is the same aluminium intensive chassis used by the Boxster. It receives a 60mm increase in the wheelbase over the platform used by the outgoing first-generation Cayman at 2475mm. The tracks have also been extended by 36mm to 1526mm at the front and 5mm to 1540mm at the rear, giving it an even more confident stance.

As with the Boxster, the new car also adopts an electro-mechanical steering system and comes with the option of Porsche’s PASM (Porsche Active Suspension Management) that offers differing damping, throttle and steering characteristics. The Cayman wears 18-inch wheels – 8 inches wide up front and 9 inches at the rear, shod with 235/45 and 265/45 tyres. The 19 inch wheels of the Cayman S are 8 inch wide up front and 9.5 inches at the rear and come with lower profile 235/40 and 265/40 rubber. The standard steel brakes are 315mm in diameter for the Cayman and 330mm for the Cayman S up front, with the two sharing the same 299mm rotors at the rear.

The reduction in height is said to provide a lower centre of gravity – something Porsche claims is at the heart of improvements in the Cayman’s overall dynamic ability. Nothing is official just yet but insiders suggest the Cayman S is up to 10sec per lap faster around the Nürburgring than the old model.

Our Verdict

Porsche Cayman 2005-2013

Is the Porsche Cayman a Boxster with a fixed roof or a mini 911?

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Comments
19

28 November 2012

Will Porsche continue to charge more for the Cayman than it does for the Boxster, something which virtually every other company doesn't do with their fixed head variants, inc Porsche with the 911?

29 November 2012

Presumably the price difference could be smaller this time around, since both cars were developed more closely together this time, or so I reckon. Still , the Cayman/S has 10bhp more, and it's touted as the more focused vehicle by Porsche, so I guess it'll still cost more.
And I've got to say, I was sceptical when I saw the picture that was posted from the french magazine this morning, but now that I've seen it, I really like it a lot more than the previous one. 

29 November 2012

so its just a facelift of the old cayman pdk?, used one it is then.

29 November 2012

It has happen. Essentially the purpose and reason for the Cayman have been made moot. Simply, the performance of 2013 Cayman S is virtually similar to the current basic 911. It begs the question, why would I buy a basic 911? The 0-60 time is only a millisecond in difference. The top speed varies by 4 miles per hour. Other figures show negligible differences. And of course in US dollars it’s almost a $20,000 dollars difference in price leaving plenty of room for upgrades. 

Will you buy it because it’s a 911? While the badge of a 911 is great how well would you sleep knowing that the other car you passed on the lot performs just about the same and is far less? Porsche has simple tried to fill a gap in their car market, but in there pursuit of performance has overly improved the car. The Cayman hasn’t merely encroached on the 911’s territory it has invaded.

In short, I propose this question why buy a basic Porsche 911 over the 2013 Cayman S?

29 November 2012

Cayman has 2 seats.  911 has four.  Have you ever tried squeezing a couple of kids in the back of a Cayman !  Just means you can use your 911 more of the time.

29 November 2012

simplelife wrote:

In short, I propose this question why buy a basic Porsche 911 over the 2013 Cayman S?

Because the two cars offer entirely different driving and ownership propositions. Anyone can see that, surely?

29 November 2012

If we were talking about the 911 S, then of course its apple and oranges. Yet, when you buy a basic 911 you still will want to option it putting you into the 911 S territory. Now the basic Porsche is similar in performance to the Cayman S with more room to option up the vehicle getting more bang for your dollar. I believe eventually they will have to go the route of Aston Martin and improve the basic 911. If that is not an option then the 911 S should be the starting entry point for the 911 class. I can see what you're saying, but it would be more applicable to a 911 S. Still I am sure there are some people who will be satisfied with the badge of 911. The two-seat vs. four-seats is interesting argument. I have sat in the back of Porsche and it was incredible uncomfortable. Still buying a basic 911 for carrying kids might not be enough justification for the basic 911 when the 911 S can do it better. I would really like to hear more thoughts on it. I am not the only person in this car world who has questioned the existence of a basic 911 since the arrival of the 2013 Porsche Cayman S.

30 November 2012

simplelife wrote:

If we were talking about the 911 S, then of course its apple and oranges. Yet, when you buy a basic 911 you still will want to option it putting you into the 911 S territory. Now the basic Porsche is similar in performance to the Cayman S with more room to option up the vehicle getting more bang for your dollar. I believe eventually they will have to go the route of Aston Martin and improve the basic 911. If that is not an option then the 911 S should be the starting entry point for the 911 class. I can see what you're saying, but it would be more applicable to a 911 S. Still I am sure there are some people who will be satisfied with the badge of 911. The two-seat vs. four-seats is interesting argument. I have sat in the back of Porsche and it was incredible uncomfortable. Still buying a basic 911 for carrying kids might not be enough justification for the basic 911 when the 911 S can do it better. I would really like to hear more thoughts on it. I am not the only person in this car world who has questioned the existence of a basic 911 since the arrival of the 2013 Porsche Cayman S.

It's not simply about performance, though, is it? The Cayman is mid-engined, the 911 rear. They're entirely different cars. Why do some people beat Porsche with this particular stick? It builds what are arguably the world's best roadster and mid-engined sportscar at the price, arguably the best SUV, and a timeless sportscar in the 911. Personally, I love the Panamera, too.

We don't often hear Merc, Audi or BMW being beat like this and their respective ranges overlap way more.

29 November 2012

It is such a shame that the ugliest car known to man, the pigamera was used as the design starting point for the new cayman.

29 November 2012

Bizarrely while i liiked everything about the old Cayman my one criticism was the tailgate which I didn't like. With this one the only thing I find acceptable is the tail gate - the rest of it looks like to my eye like a kit car version of the Cayman as opposed to the real thing.

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