SMMT chief hopes the government will continue to support the UK car industry after scrappage
9 December 2009

The Society of Motor Manufacturers (SMMT) has called on the government to do more to support the British car industry.

SMMT chief executive Paul Everitt said scrappage had been a welcome boost to the flagging industry, but he hoped the government’s pre-budget report would reveal further ways it intended to help the industry long term.

“Scrappage continues to have a positive impact on vehicle registrations, contributing to the 57.6 per cent increase in November’s registrations,” he said. “It has helped to generate consumer confidence and SMMT urges government to sustain the recovery and support the long-term future of the motor industry through its pre-budget report.”

His comments follow the SMMT’s announcement that more than 250,000 vehicles had now been sold under scrappage.

In November, more than one in five cars sold was under scrappage. Since it was introduced in May, new car sales have increased every month since July halting 15 months of consecutive decline. The scheme is expected to run out in February.

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Comments
7

9 December 2009

Why are you still using that misleading Focus picture? We all know it wasn't a victim of scrappage as its a facelift model that would have been too new.

R32

9 December 2009

[quote Autocar]The Society of Motor Manufacturers (SMMT) has called on the government to do more to support the British car industry.
[/quote]

I rather think the government (sorry, taxpayers) have done enough to help the motor industry. There are many industries, companies and businesses out there who are in desperate need of financial support and as yet the government hasn't done anything to assist them (I can think of Woolworths, and every other firm that has closed or had massive job losses). The SMMT should be grateful for what assistance the industry has had and stop pretending that the UK motor industry is a charity. It is a business that has already received state assistance and should be grateful for that.

I am a huge car enthusiast yes, but I am also a businessman. So my views are not just from an car enthusiast's point of view, they are from a business perspective as well.

9 December 2009

Why all the fuss about the auto industry. UK construction industry is on its arse too. Target money there and you can be sure the jobs being protected are British, unlike scrappage which seemed to have the South Korean car industry as the main benificiary.

9 December 2009

In the early stages of the recession I remember hearing Paul Everett on the radio moaning about how people werent buying new cars. The fact that these same people might have just lost their jobs, or were in fear of doing so didnt seem to occur to him. Now, after all the help the motor industry has had, whereas other sectors of the economy have had none, he is still not satisfied. I find it very irritating.

10 December 2009

[quote tannedbaldhead]Why all the fuss about the auto industry. UK construction industry is on its arse too. Target money there and you can be sure the jobs being protected are British, unlike scrappage which seemed to have the South Korean car industry as the main benificiary.[/quote]

I totally agree but it's not just the Uk construction industry that needs targeting, there needs to be more incentive for Uk engineering as well.

People seem to think all of the UK engineering is tied into the car industry and is therefore benefiting from the scrappage scheme but it's not, and it's struggling to keep going with no help from the government what so ever. This nation used to rule the world when it came to engineering, we were the best of the best, but now it's a shell of what it once was, due to a lack of proper support from successive governments.

A big problem with the scrappage scheme is that it has encouraged alot of foreign imports into the country helping other economies more than our own, whilst at the same time hampering the secondhand car market, which again is costing our economy.

And why can the motor industry not come up with it's own incentives and better deals to encourage car sales?. I've just been reading about when the original mini was introduced and Ford worked out that it was being sold at a loss, just to get cars on the streets!. I'm not saying this is the way to go, it's business suicide, but there are things the manufacturers could do, without relying on the Taxpayers.

R32

10 December 2009

[quote 4rephill]

A big problem with the scrappage scheme is that it has encouraged alot of foreign imports into the country helping other economies more than our own, whilst at the same time hampering the secondhand car market, which again is costing our economy.

[/quote]

Absolutely. This is because the government introduced the scrappage scheme as a knee-jerk reaction to what was going on at the time without thinking it through (or thinking about it at all).

I posted a response regarding electric vehicles and emissions, highlighting the unfairness of the governments decision to re-band the car tax bandings for road tax and in particular, how it was made retrospective. This denied motorists the opportunity to decide whether they wanted to buy a car that requires a £400 per year tax disc. You've bought your car that requires £210 and now we're charging you £400 - too bad, was the governments attitude. With scrappage, they have also made it quite unfair. Only people with vehicles over a certain age qualify - what about everyone else. Oh, that's right - penalise them as their cars are too "new". What about someone driving an 8 year old Fiesta - they don't qualify either. What a disgrace the scrappage scheme is - I can't wait until it's over.

15 December 2009

[quote R32]

[quote 4rephill]

A big problem [url=http://www.utelio.it/immatricolazioni_auto_2009_2010.php]immatricolazion... with the scrappage scheme is that it has encouraged alot of foreign imports into the country helping other economies more than our own, whilst at the same time hampering the secondhand car market, which again is costing our economy.

[/quote]

Absolutely. This is because the government introduced the scrappage scheme as a knee-jerk reaction to what was going on at the time without thinking it through (or thinking about it at all).

I posted a response regarding electric vehicles and emissions, highlighting the unfairness of the governments decision to re-band the car tax bandings for road tax and in particular, how it was made retrospective. This denied motorists the opportunity to decide whether they wanted to buy a car that requires a £400 per year tax disc. You've bought your car that requires £210 and now we're charging you £400 - too bad, was the governments attitude. With scrappage, they have also made it quite unfair. Only people with vehicles over a certain age qualify - what about everyone else. Oh, that's right - penalise them as their cars are too "new". What about someone driving an 8 year old Fiesta - they don't qualify either. What a disgrace the scrappage scheme is - I can't wait until it's over.

[/quote]

very good thanks


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