Manufacturers withdraw from scheme as funds dry up
16 March 2010

Car buyers hoping to take advantage of the government's £2000 scrappage incentive could miss out - even though the scheme is scheduled to run until the end of March.

Some of the major manufacturers involved have now closed their order books, having used up their funding allocations.

Fiat, Audi, Volkswagen, Hyundai and Kia said they have suspended scrappage orders after selling all the cars their cash allocation allowed under the programme.

The backlog of orders generated by the scheme is likely to see the final few hundred cars for each manufacturer used up in days.

However, Honda, Citroen and Peugeot have reported that they expect to continue the scheme until the end of the month.

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8

16 March 2010

are we all paying increased taxes, for this brainless scrappage fund.

www.KOOOLcr.com

 

16 March 2010

And the point of this article is what.......

How much money do you want the Government to throw at foreign Car companies, we have done our bit to generate a false economy and maintain manufacturing jobs in other countries , as well as the service industry in the UK.

However, the econmoy has to eventually stand on it's own 2 feet and removing these schemes is part of that process.

The 'Government' prides itself in saving the Free Western World economy by offering incentives to purchase cars, etc. However, it fails to admit that it was part of the initial problem that helped get into these problems and now we , the public , are left to pick up the shattered pieces of a country that is financially broke.

Car Companies must realise they produce too many cars and variations and need to understand that people will keep cars longer now that previously, especially as the price of petrol, tax, parking, increases, cars will eventually be used less and the need to buy a new car will reduce.

The only good thing to come from this scheme, is that many old dangerous cars have gone from the roads, the down side , everyone is now driving small boxes, which are cheap on thrills, do not use much petrol and car tax, which ultimately means less tax income for the government. So they will be forced to increase indirect tax , to hit the pocket elsewhere.

Still at least in May, we could end up with a Hung Government , with a useless leader, with no policies, decisions or capability of getting us out of this mess....... Oh no change then from the past 13 years.

16 March 2010

[quote Elvisisntdead]The only good thing to come from this scheme, is that many old dangerous cars have gone from the roads[/quote]

I am not convinced the cars that should have been scrapped have. The people who can afford to take advantage of this scheme have usually had enough money to look after their cars quite well. The cars that should have gone are largely still out there.

It was a rubbish scheme and the sooner the money runs out the sooner we can forget about it

16 March 2010

Now watch the Kia/Hyundai market share nose dive again.

16 March 2010

[quote artill]I am not convinced the cars that should have been scrapped have[/quote]

i think that there are an awful lot of lovely cars which needn't have been scrapped, but there have also been thousands of old cars replaced with safer new cars.

Pretty much any car from the 1980s or 1990s does not have anything like the latest advances in ESP and multiple airbag systems that even the most basic new cars have. NCAP testing might not be perfect, but it has undoubtedly raised the bar for safety.

The question of overall eco-friendliness and economic benefit of the program is another debate altogether, but vehicle safety is one aspect of the scheme that needs to be acknowledged.

16 March 2010

[quote Lee23404]

Now watch the Kia/Hyundai market share nose dive again.

[/quote]

We can live in hope

16 March 2010

I wonder what Autocar's take is on this, after all, they were one of the main players in lobbying the government to get scrappage introduced, encouraging us all (well, not me) to sign their petitions...

16 March 2010

[quote disco.stu]

i think that there are an awful lot of lovely cars which needn't have been scrapped, but there have also been thousands of old cars replaced with safer new cars.

Pretty much any car from the 1980s or 1990s does not have anything like the latest advances in ESP and multiple airbag systems that even the most basic new cars have. NCAP testing might not be perfect, but it has undoubtedly raised the bar for safety.

The question of overall eco-friendliness and economic benefit of the program is another debate altogether, but vehicle safety is one aspect of the scheme that needs to be acknowledged.

[/quote]

Do these little Korean things have ESP? But i agree generally most cars are much safer than the previous generations.

On another point, i would love to know what the 400,000 cars scrapped have been. How many thousands of escorts, etc, but also how many MK4 golfs, and how many proper classics.

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