Dieter Zetsche also states that the fuel is crucial to reducing the amount of CO2 put into the atmosphere

Carbon dioxide rather than NOx is “the biggest issue” of combustion engines, and customers are showing more confidence in diesel than politicians by continuing to buy them in significant numbers, according to Mercedes boss Dieter Zetsche.

Insight: Is it time to give up on the diesel engine?

Highlighting that the firm sold more diesels in Europe in 2017 than in 2016, and that diesels are crucial to reducing the amount of CO2 put into the atmosphere, Zetsche said: “I do believe it is not to the benefit of society to turn down the benefits of CO2 savings that diesels offer. We are talking a lot about NOX but I believe CO2 is still the biggest issue.

“In 2018 we are seeing a small dip in diesel take-up, but customers on the whole are still showing confidence. More than 50% of our sales are diesels. They are more open to the options than the political discussions suggest.”

Despite this Mercedes is investigating voluntarily introducing its own economy and emissions bandings to help drivers understand the effects of different types of driving and roads. “The new regulations and test methods are a great step forward, but if we can offer even more realistic information that helps the customer then it can only be a good thing,” he said.

Read more 

Insight: Is it time to give up on the diesel engine?

Diesel registrations down 31% in November as UK market shrinks

Diesel hit hard as January car sales fall by 6.3%

Our Verdict

Mini Cooper 5-door hatch

Third-generation Mini hatchback comes with a range of new engines, more equipment and a practical five-door shape, but is it stretching the Mini name too far?

Join the debate

Comments
24

2 April 2018

Mercedes sell a lot of larger cars which tend to suit diesel and perhaps more importantly they sell to alot of fleets or people leasing their cars. Providing the monthly payments are acceptable, of course people are still going to buy diesel, they've nothing to lose. However the problem may come in trying to sell those cars after three years when the average private buyer is more wary of where they put their money. Not just because of the threat of government legislation but also as buyers become more knowledgable over whether their needs are best served by a diesel car.

2 April 2018

Hybrids have very low NOx emissions and beat comparable diesels in CO2. 

2 April 2018
Revenge of the Prius wrote:

Hybrids have very low NOx emissions and beat comparable diesels in CO2. 

until they run out of battery power, you cant tell me a 3 tonne, 2.0litre, 4 cylinder petrol RangeRover hybrid is more economical or kinder for the environment than the equivalent diesel model. 

2 April 2018

"until they run out of battery power"

The batteries are recharged every time you brake.  The heavier the vehicle, the greater the hybridisation benefit as there is more energy to be saved/recycled.  So yes, a hybrid is better in a two tonne vehicle providing that there is a suitable level of electric power and storage capacity than an IC engine which sends energy to the brakes and it's wasted every time you slow down.

It's a shame that DrZ bailed out of the Two Mode hybridised Transmssion project with GM and BMW.  If they hadn't, they'd have a strong Hybrid in every RWD model in the range right now.  Reason given was cost.  I'll bet they're kicking themselves now!

2 April 2018

Ruaraidh wrote: The heavier the vehicle, the greater the hybridisation benefit as there is more energy to be saved/recycled.  You certainly forgot thay accelerating a heavy vehicle requires more energy than that recycled. Therefore, still lighter is more economical.

2 April 2018
Citytiger wrote:

Revenge of the Prius wrote:

Hybrids have very low NOx emissions and beat comparable diesels in CO2. 

until they run out of battery power, you cant tell me a 3 tonne, 2.0litre, 4 cylinder petrol RangeRover hybrid is more economical or kinder for the environment than the equivalent diesel model. 

 

One person is argueing about NOx and the other is argueing about CO2.

Hybrid ( Toyota/Lexus one anyway) do pump out less NOx than diesels or petrol alone. They run on a cycle called Atkinson,. In a real word example, on a motorway , for a hybrid/pretrol, the petrol engine is running at around 1200-1500rpm when the car is doing 70mph, in a pure petrol car the engine is running at more than 1200-1500rpm whist doing 70mph ( this is compring with my old petrol car anyway)

 

Anyway, i think diesels are a devils fuel.. needing lots of filters and a turbo and other complicated auxillary systems to make it clean, and even when clean under Euro6 standards, is really dirty in real word driving..

 

 

2 April 2018
mpls wrote:

Citytiger wrote:

Revenge of the Prius wrote:

Hybrids have very low NOx emissions and beat comparable diesels in CO2. 

until they run out of battery power, you cant tell me a 3 tonne, 2.0litre, 4 cylinder petrol RangeRover hybrid is more economical or kinder for the environment than the equivalent diesel model. 

 

One person is argueing about NOx and the other is argueing about CO2.

Hybrid ( Toyota/Lexus one anyway) do pump out less NOx than diesels or petrol alone. They run on a cycle called Atkinson,. In a real word example, on a motorway , for a hybrid/pretrol, the petrol engine is running at around 1200-1500rpm when the car is doing 70mph, in a pure petrol car the engine is running at more than 1200-1500rpm whist doing 70mph ( this is compring with my old petrol car anyway)

 

Anyway, i think diesels are a devils fuel.. needing lots of filters and a turbo and other complicated auxillary systems to make it clean, and even when clean under Euro6 standards, is really dirty in real word driving..

 

 

No they're not really dirty in real world driving - check your facts. If you would like to pay my 40k miles a year fuel bill in a less efficient petrol option, please do feel free. Otherwise pipe down with your sweeping statements.

2 April 2018
Revenge of the Prius wrote:

Hybrids have very low NOx emissions and beat comparable diesels in CO2. 

Wrong. In urban driving yes, but if one is regularly doing freeway driving then diesel is still the superior choice. There is simply no contest there yet. The latest Prius is admittedly good though.

2 April 2018

...his factories are still churning out millions of  diesels.

 

When he gets his belated hybrids and electrical cars into production he will soon be condemning dirty diesel....

Steam cars are due a revival.

2 April 2018
Thekrankis wrote:

...his factories are still churning out millions of  diesels.

 

That would be because millions of buyers put down good money for them. Funny thing, supply and demand.

Pages

Add your comment

Log in or register to post comments

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week

  • Land Rover Discovery
    First Drive
    23 May 2018
    Does the Land Rover Discovery – a vehicle designed to put in the hard yards – cut it as an executive company car? We ran it for seven months to find out
  • Aston Martin Vantage 2018 review hero front
    Car review
    23 May 2018
    Aston Martin’s cheapest model takes a big step up into the 21st century
  • Hyundai i30 N
    Standard spec is good so paint colour is our car’s only option
    First Drive
    22 May 2018
    What’s Hyundai’s first hot hatch and N-brand debutant really like? Let’s find out
  • DS 7 Crossback PureTech 225 2018 review hero front
    First Drive
    22 May 2018
    New petrol engine and top-end Ultra Prestige spec help broaden the Crossback's appeal, but do little to help it stand out in a crowded market
  • Audi TT RS Coupé
    First Drive
    22 May 2018
    The Audi TT RS has the looks, a vociferous engine and the supercar-baiting performance, but is it too uncompromising to use as a daily driver?