Chrysler to stick to UK growth plan despite Lancia's reduction to a single model for the Italian market only, which spells the end for the Delta
Mark Tisshaw
22 January 2014

The Chrysler Delta is set to be axed from sale in the UK. The model has already disappeared from the list of new vehicles for sale on Chrysler's UK website.

Chrysler has yet to officially confirm the Delta's deletion from UK price lists. An announcement is likely soon given the fact its donor car, the Lancia Delta, will be exiting production as part of plans outlined by Fiat-Chrysler chief Sergio Marchionne to reduce the Lancia brand to sales only in Italy, where the sole model offered will be the Lancia Ypsilon supermini. 

For now, the Delta can still be sourced new from Chrysler dealers as models remain in stock but it has not been a sales success here. The Chrysler brand as a whole sold 2515 cars in the UK in 2013, a drop of 24.54 per cent from the 3333 units sold in 2012. 

Chrysler told Autocar it "still has volume aspirations in the UK" and will continue to sell its rebadged version of the Ypsilon, the 300C saloon and Grand Voyager MPV. The range of models would "maintain a presence for the Chrysler brand" in the UK, according to the company. 

Following the initial tie-up between Fiat and Chrysler, which has now turned into a full-blown takeover, Marchionne attempted to merge the Chrysler and Lancia brands. In mainland Europe, Lancia sold its own Ypsilon and Delta models alongside its own rebadged versions of the Chrysler 300C, Grand Voyager and 200 Convertible models. In the UK, the Ypsilon and Delta were sold as Chryslers. 

Our Verdict

Chrysler Delta

The Chrysler Delta is a bit different from the norm, but it is too patchy to recommend it highly.

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Comments
20

21 January 2014
Once again more dreams.

21 January 2014
It's hard to believe that this will happen.

Lancia is unsustainable on a single model in the home market so the Ypsilon has to morph, rather sensibly, into the Fiat 500 5 door, also replacing the Punto.

The Delta is effectively dead but the Giulietta can be continued and the Bravo could be replaced by the Viaggio. A next version of the MiTo might also have five doors, again filling some of the Punto gap.

That would leave Chrysler with just the pointless and unsuccessful 300 and the people carrier, hence not enough to sustain it. In Europe (and the USA), a Fiat mid-sized SUV might easily replace the Freemont and the Lancia Voyager and a new Alfa Giulia will be a happy replacement for the 300.

21 January 2014
Despite the fighting talk from the management lopping £10k off the asking price of the 300C - cementing the previous 'offer' - is surely not going in the right direction? The previous model was reasonably successful considering it was an American car. The fact the new model is better but sells a fraction of the old one tells its own story. They'll be another Chevrolet within a few years.


21 January 2014
Last month Chrysler sold 49 cars in the UK. It may have volume aspirations, but is not going to reach them.
Will the UK go the way of Denmark which has neither Lancia or Chrysler on sale anymore.
Given sales in the Republic of Ireland were closer to 0 than 10 for the whole year, will Fiat bother making RHD models which sell so few?

22 January 2014
AndyT wrote:

Last month Chrysler sold 49 cars in the UK. It may have volume aspirations, but is not going to reach them.
Will the UK go the way of Denmark which has neither Lancia or Chrysler on sale anymore.
Given sales in the Republic of Ireland were closer to 0 than 10 for the whole year, will Fiat bother making RHD models which sell so few?

I think that has more to do with the extraordinary tax on cars in that country. A lot of cars don't sell l there because of this. I remember a friend moved there and wanted to buy a brand new Citroen ZX (it is some time ago) and it was nearly £30,000 with tax. It is a little better now but budget brands and prestige sell well, anything else doesn't.

21 January 2014
The Ypsilon is fine in a quirky manor, but really needs better engines. The base 1.2 is fine for a base engine, but i am not convinced about the twinair (either for economy, refinement, or longevity). It could also do with a price cut.

They need a new Delta too (will we be getting the new 200?) because its not a model range to have the Ypsilon at one end, and the 300 at the other.

The 300 has huge presence, and looks great. But Fiat overpriced it when they introduced the current model, and even with the £10,000 price cut it not cheap, just back roughly where the last model was. If it gets the 8 speed box to replace the 5 speed box that will help. I think it needs a petrol engine too. Most buyers will be private, as the CO2 is too high for a CoCar, and many private buyers dont want the time bomb of the modern diesel.

21 January 2014
I've always loved the Ypsilon and used to enjoy seeing them when I was abroad on holiday. Dropping the Lancia name was necessary presumably because those of us old enough to remember the Beta fiasco wouldn't have even considered a Lancia, ever.
There are pre-registered Ypsilons out there at quite considerable discounts, even with the twin-air engine and I must admit I'm tempted. The only problem might be that the depreciation continues at the same rate and when it comes time to trade-in you're left with a car that's worth a fraction of its original price. My only solution might be to keep the car for longer, but I'd prefer that as a choice, not a necessity.

21 January 2014
The Lancia name still has loads of cache - people remember the Delta Integrale better than they remember the whole rust fiasco. Theyd deffo sell more Ypsilons and Deltas if they wore the Lancia name plate. Fiat wants to build some decent Lancias on Alfa platforms, not moth-ball the brand in every country apart from Italy. In these days where branding is everything, a name like Lancia is worth too much to limit only to the home market, theyre mad.

Buy a car a few years old, n50pap, thats the only sensible thing to do, buying a brand new car is quite literally throwing money away.

21 January 2014
It's going to be like a jumble sale of cars. Fiat will focus on the small city cars. Then Chrysler, Lancia and Alfa will just badge whatever fits to get sales through.

Across the Atlantic Chrysler will be the cash and profit cow to prop the rest of Fiat Group up.

Really as long as Ferrari stays fairly autonomous from the rest of the group no one could really car less about this bizarre amalgamation.

21 January 2014
They aren't going to announce this straight away while the cars are still on sale, but I can't see how this will work long term.

Chrysler will be slowly phased out and the better performing dealers will be merged into a combined Fiat/Alfa Romeo/Jeep dealership network

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