Currently reading: Geneva motor show 2010: Giulietta's UK Goodwood launch
New Alfa hatch makes its UK debut at Goodwood
Autocar
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3 mins read
19 March 2010

The Alfa Romeo Giulietta has made its UK debut at the launch of Goodwood's summer motorsport season.

See the Alfa Romeo Giulietta at Goodwood

The Giulietta replaces the 147 and has been through three name changes already. Originally called 148, it was then renamed Milano. That name has now been changed due to pressure from Alfa workers in the firm's home city of Milan, who are unhappy with the use of the name following Alfa's decision to relocate to Turin. The firm has now settled on calling it Giulietta.

Alfa plans to launch the Giulietta in Italy in late March. The UK launch will coincide with the Goodwood Festival of Speed in June, where Alfa Romeo will be the featured marque.

The car will be made as a five-door only. It features a Golf-sized rear compartment but a coupe-like roofline and disguised rear door handles (as used on the 147) to enhance its sporting credentials. The shape draws obvious influence from both the outgoing 147 and the new Mito supermini, but it looks more modern than either.

It has the most striking three-dimensional version of Alfa’s shield grille yet, supported by two prominent lower lateral air intakes. The muscular sculpting of the body sides leads to prominent rear haunches, with twin exhausts and a diffuser beneath a rear panel whose LED tail-lights echo shapes pioneered in the 156.

Suspension is MacPherson struts at the front and a new multi-link design at the rear.

Inside, the Giulietta echoes the twin-binnacle, driver-oriented fascia design that Alfas have traditionally used, but with the familiar centre stack replaced with a simplified, lateral panel. The interior uses novel trim textures and body-coloured metal to signify a change from Alfa traditions.

At 4.35m in length, the car is 130mm longer than the Golf or the 147. The 2.63m wheelbase is about 50mm longer than the Golf’s or 147’s, and although its extra length makes it look low, it is 50mm higher than the car it replaces.

Alfa engineers say rear seat space and boot capacity are “the same or bigger” than a Golf’s and that the overall weight is “a little bit heavier” than a comparable 147’s, even though the body-in-white is lighter.

Buyers will be offered three different designs of 16in, 17in and 18in wheel - a thick-spoke design, a multi-spoke and Alfa’s familiar ‘telephone dial’ design.

A range of the Fiat Group’s transversely mounted four-cylinder diesel and petrol engines, all turbocharged, will drive the front wheels, ranging from a 120bhp 1.4-litre petrol to a 170bhp 2.0-litre diesel. Later next year there will be a 230bhp Cloverleaf model.

All Giuliettas will eventually be available with Fiat’s Multiair electro-hydraulic valve actuation. And all get automatic stop-start as standard.

The line-up will feature five and six-speed manual gearboxes, but Fiat is working on a semi-auto twin-clutch alternative. The cars will get Alfa’s DNA suspension and engine settings system.

Alfa’s production targets for the car are aggressive. It aims to make as many as 100,000 cars a year when the model has been launched in all markets, against a predicted Mito volume of 60,000-plus.

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After a lengthy spell in the doldrums, Alfa’s volume is tipped to rise from 107,000 units in 2007 to about 115,000 this year and about 140,000 in 2010, with further expansion after that if the car gets off to a good start. Alfa officials say it is too early to forecast pricing but emphasise the fact that, like that of the Mito, it will be very competitive.

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Will86 3 March 2010

Re: Alfa Romeo Giulietta - new pics

tonym911 wrote:
I thought lease costs were determined by whole-life costs – which include things like repair, servicing and depreciation – not by rumours of unreliability, or by 'the costs of the oily bits that make Alfas sporty' etc. Methinks the Alfa defenders are just as guilty of objectivity failure here as the people they are castigating for the same reason.

+1

Unfortunately for Alfa, few people can buy a car because of it's beauty and soul; it actually has to work too. And I don't mean reliability, I mean the basics of being able to handle the family, pushchairs in the boot, long commutes and most importantly being cost effective to run. These are all areas where Ford, Vauxhall, VW etc are strong and which is why they sell so well. Unless Alfa can address the more mundane aspects of motoring as well as offering a bit of passion, they will remain a left field choice.

Mr_H 3 March 2010

Re: Alfa Romeo Giulietta - new pics

Colonel Snappy wrote:
guilty of some of the laziest and most hackneyed national stereotypes I've ever seen. German=clinical, lacking in passion. Italian=soulful, etc.
Colonel Snappy - having owned 2 Italian cars, driven several others, then driven various BMWs, VWs, Vauxhall-Opels, Mercs etc. I acknowledge that not all stereotypes apply (actually the car I found the most fun to drive was a Ford Ka many moons ago). However, every Italian car I've driven has had the same verve, and has left me with a smile on my face. I've yet to drive a German or especially Japanese car that does the same......and I'm not talking about super-cars, just ordinary run-of-the-mill cars that ordinary people buy and drive. I'm also not castigating anyone - merely voicing an opinion that it would be a shame for Alfa-Romeo to lose the one thing that sets it apart from say, a SEAT, in a drive for increased sales. There are far more competent and technically adept cars on the market, and if that floats your boat, then fair enough. However, Alfa's image and reputation is built up of a different set of subjective responses to that of say, Audi, and it attracts a different type of enthusiast, who is more likely to buy into catchphrases such as 'soul', or 'passion'. And, whether you like it or not, there are fundamental differences in the national characteristics of Germans and Italians, which thankfully, is exhibited in their different approaches to car design and engineering. Incidentally, your comment of
Colonel Snappy wrote:
the Giulietta looks nice, but let's see if it's as good as it looks before rushing to judgement
has been used by sceptics to round off their subjective opinion of Alfas for as long as I can remember.....

Colonel Snappy 3 March 2010

Re: Alfa Romeo Giulietta - new pics

"Methinks the Alfa defenders are just as guilty of objectivity failure here as the people they are castigating for the same reason." Precisely. And guilty of some of the laziest and most hackneyed national stereotypes I've ever seen. German=clinical, lacking in passion. Italian=soulful, etc., usually accompanied by some words of Italian that they probably read off a pizza menu. Yawn. That said, the Giulietta looks nice, but let's see if it's as good as it looks before rushing to judgement.

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