Sport considering using turbocharged 1.5-litre engines from 2013, according to a report
15 April 2010

Formula One bosses are considering a switch to turbocharged 1.5-litre engines from 2013, according to a report.

The move is designed to attract new sponsors, teams and manufacturers to the sport, as well as promoting the sport’s ‘green’ credentials, according to a “highly reliable” source quoted by pitpass.com.

F1 bosses are currently trying to secure a return for KERS in 2011, but the source said the talks “were only half the story” and longer-term changes to engine regulations were at the centre of the discussions. Most manufacturers, as well as the FIA, are said to be pushing towards downsized powerplants more relevant to road cars, but Ferrari in particular is believed to be leading the resistance.

Another insider quoted by the website said, “A number of possible engine configurations are being looked at but all at a sensitive stage. [There is a big push] for current units to remain [for cost reasons] but the FIA is keen on a step change in technology.”

One such manufacturer which has talked about entering the sport, should it improve its image and drive down costs, is Volkswagen. The German firm has pencilled in 2013 as the date it could potentially enter F1, either by setting up a team from scratch or buying into Williams.

Michelin has also this week talked about a return to F1, but has imposed several conditions on the FIA: it wants a switch to 18-inch rims to make its F1 tyres more relevant to its road and sports car programmes, and it wants the sport to be doing more for the environment.

Turbocharging was first introduced to F1 by Renault in 1977, but the 1000bhp-plus units were eventually banned by the FIA for the 1989 season.

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23

15 April 2010

Surely the best way to add interest in F1 would to be less regulation.

To promote a green F1 the best was would be to restrict fuel use and insist engines use pump fuel (Tesco 99!). This would advance engine and fuel technology and allow any engine configuration to add interest, we could have N/A, Turbo or Supercharged engines.

One downside of this would be fuel management would become a part of racing but then that bring F1 in line with everyone else who drives in the current world of high fuel tax!

15 April 2010

[quote troggy]

To promote a green F1 the best was would be to restrict fuel use and insist engines use pump fuel (Tesco 99!). This would advance engine and fuel technology and allow any engine configuration to add interest, we could have N/A, Turbo or Supercharged engines.

One downside of this would be fuel management would become a part of racing but then that bring F1 in line with everyone else who drives in the current world of high fuel tax!

[/quote]

+1

15 April 2010

Moto GP have fuel limits right now and it has not ruined the racing, I think the engine limit may have an impact this year though. Regarding F1 I think 1.25 or 1.5 litre turbo engines and unrestricted KERS would result in extremely fast cars and allow a filter down of relevant tech. Also a reduction in the minimum weight at the same time would be good for both safety and performance. And please get rid of that plank, I am sure there is a more elegant solution to minimum ride height. A lot of the great things about F1 have been the technology, not the racing. I think allowing a few maverick ideas is what the fans want. Everyone remembers the Brabham fan car or the 6 wheel Tyrrell, I had the Tyrrell Scalextric car, fond memories.

15 April 2010

I've never really understood why the rules of F1 specify the type and size of engine etc. Now that the emphasis is on being more "green" overall I would suggest the following simple rules : 1. Use any engine you can develope provided in meets rules 2 & 3. 2. You must use the supplied fuel tank and one tank of fuel per race. 3. The total cost of each car must not exceed £????? and you must not use more than three cars and engines per driver per season. Anything else goes. Simples.


Enjoying a Fabia VRs - affordable performance

15 April 2010

I think that the FIA should allow use of both types of engines, 1.5 turbo and atmospheric 3.0L V8. In that way, each team ( or maybe is better to say constructor ) will have a free choice between these two types of engines. If I remember well, we've already had this situation in the mid '80s ....

15 April 2010

[quote troggy]insist engines use pump fuel (Tesco 99!). [/quote]

This is pretty much exactly what they run anyway. There is nothing in F1 race fuel that isn't in 99 octane unleaded. The main difference is in the quality control, particularly the various constituents are blended to more tightly controlled tolerances.

An F1 engine will run on 99 octane no problem at all and it won't pink. The only downside is a power loss of around 1-1/2% which amounts to about 12hp at full revs.

15 April 2010

[quote Scighera]

I think that the FIA should allow use of both types of engines, 1.5 turbo and atmospheric 3.0L V8. In that way, each team ( or maybe is better to say constructor ) will have a free choice between these two types of engines. If I remember well, we've already had this situation in the mid '80s .... [/quote]

Yes, but it didn't work. Remember 1988, when McLaren were the only turbo team to bother designing a new car and blew the opposition away? Ferrari were a distant second in their updated 1987 car, and were still miles in front of the fastest new-generation 'atmo' cars. Even Lotus' largely-rubbish 100T was usually quicker than the fastest Williams, Benetton and March, which were the best of the non-turbos.

Once the turbos took hold in the early 1980s, atmo cars did not stand a chance. There would have to be serious equalisation regulation to try and match them, and it wouldn't work well.

15 April 2010

The most crucial thing to have happened in recent years was the retirement of a certain Michael Schumacher! Winning race after race after race was utterly killing the sport. That and ITV's pathetic coverage. Now we have races where any one of four or so manufacturers can win a race, albeit sans overtaking.

For as long as I can remember, it has been mistakes and failures that have made interesting races. Rain, gearboxes losing a gear, fading brakes and so on. Utterly reliable cars with utterly boring drivers do not make for good sport. Unfortunately the rules now promote long duration engines and tediously sensible design.

I am still not convinced turbo engines are really "green". Just that by their nature, in road cars, they appear to produce low emissions because the standard test is pootling around a virtual town at 25mph and the turbo doesn't cut in.

15 April 2010

A 1.5 turbo with KERS would put F1 cars on a technical par with the next gen of road cars so I can understand how that is appealing to the manufacturers. The only thing I don't like is anything too false, so I don't want to see a push-to-pass button or overboost etc.

I admire the sentiment from some of the guys talking about complete technical freedom, but it is just not possible. You only have to look at the current cars. The new regs should have reduced downforce by 25% but the teams are already back to 2008 levels. Total technical freedom would be impossible, and the racing wouldn't be any better as acceleration and braking zones would be even shorter and the turbulent air even worse.

15 April 2010

The reason for little overtaking is down to the drivers and cars being so evenly matched, just check out qualifying times, then if you factor in the racing line being only 1 car wide you have the answers to the overtaking question.

To solve this cars need way more power than they can use, plus more mechanical grip and possibly less braking. This would create more mistakes to allow more overtaking.

F1 should be about innovation not cutting costs, create a standard engine blueprint for all to use and then let them run whatever else they want from KERS to active suspension. If one team runs away with it make them publish the full car specs to all the other teams ( or make it mandatory for all teams ), this would allow big steps forward for all which should then benefit joe public.

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