From £14,700
An ingenious VW-based plug-in hybrid that drives well, but it’s a good three years away

Our Verdict

Leon

Seat's third-generation Leon is attractive and capable, but it can't quite match the best this class can offer

10 November 2011

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Comments
12

10 November 2011

Unnecessarily complicated and insanely heavy, is there really any point?

10 November 2011

[quote thebaldgit]is there really any point?[/quote]

Yes

10 November 2011

[quote Smurf Yeah]

[quote thebaldgit]is there really any point?[/quote]

Yes

[/quote]

I'm not too sure myself.

10 November 2011

Amazing concept.

Just have the little voice at the back of my mind saying "what happens 4 years down the line when something goes wrong with it and they expect the whole car value to repair it"

10 November 2011

The point is, fuel is rocketing in price year on year and for the average motorist economy is going to be king. An all eletric car is just not ready yet for most people, no range and terrible performance. A petrol or diesel with a decent amount of power is never going to make the gains needed. So hybrid systems that take over when the engine is at its most innefficient is the way forward in the short to medium term. I just don't like the ooh its so complicated, what about if it breaks arguement. Thats the price of progress, people still harp on about electric windows and its just old hat now. Cars are very reliable and crammed full of all sorts of technology that could go wrong. No point in stewing about it.

Perhaps I am just from a generation that is used to a much faster changing world, I love new technology I find it interesting and love to see things progress.

10 November 2011

Great idea and as the cost of batteries comes down along with economies of scale for the rest of the drive train should end up being the same as a top of the range derv Leon. Some years off but I suppose testing whilst costs comes down is essential and will feed back data to other VAG hybrid/electric projects.

Like the interesting use of the excellent 1.4TSi engine which is a much better option than the 1.8 N/A engine in the current Pirus.

jer

11 November 2011

[quote Smurf Yeah] I love new technology I find it interesting and love to see things progress. [/quote] Me to but I struggle to see this as an efficient use of scarce resources. It's intensive in terms of manufacturing resources and day to day overhead carrying the weight of two power trains one of which is mostly redundant. If due to this duality the car lasted twice as long it would make more sense but the reality of the bleeding edge is that this cars useful life would be short.

jer

11 November 2011

[quote Smurf Yeah] I love new technology I find it interesting and love to see things progress. [/quote] Me to but I struggle to see this as an efficient use of scarce resources. It's intensive in terms of manufacturing resources and day to day overhead carrying the weight of two power trains one of which is mostly redundant. If due to this duality the car lasted twice as long it would make more sense but the reality of the bleeding edge is that this cars useful life would be short.

11 November 2011

Whilst this may be innovative it is also needlessly complex and looks like (as other have said) it would be a nightmare a couple of years down the line.

The Chevrolet Volt isn't yet quite as advanced (but that is coming) it is a far more elegant system.

Sorry, if this were in production, I would steer well clear of this.

 

 

It's all about the twisties........

11 November 2011

[quote Smurf Yeah]

Perhaps I am just from a generation that is used to a much faster changing world, I love new technology I find it interesting and love to see things progress.

[/quote]

I agree with you. The problem is how practical? Will Seat find a way to make the technology affordable?

Remember that only a few years ago VW heralded their combined supercharger and turbo engine as the way to go... and it did go, straight to the bucket. I think I'm correct in saying VW only produce one version of that engine now (in UK at least). It was far too costly / complicated to be practical.

No doubt they'll gain technological advancements from this experiment but if it does ever come to market in 2015, I certainly won't be at the front of the queue. New technology is great, but I prefer to be paid rather than pay to play guinea pig.

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