One method of deciding on a star rating for our road tests is to consider, if we had carte blanche, what we’d change about the car we’re testing.

In the Rolls-Royce Wraith’s case, considering who makes it and what it’s supposed to do, we end up with a list notable for its brevity.

Matt Saunders

Chief tester
A sublime mix of luxurious heft and near-silent tranquility. A supreme new benchmark

We suspect some owners (and us, too) would like the option of being more involved in the driving process, but apart from that there’s precious little here that we’d want different next time – apart from the obvious caveats of less weight and more efficiency that underpin all future cars.

Otherwise, the Wraith is as hushed as a car manufactured in Goodwood ought to be, yet as dynamically rewarding as any car with a near 2.5-tonne kerb weight and such an isolated ride has any right to be. In its interior and ambience, it is almost perfectly judged.

Rivals like the Aston Martin Rapide might be ten times the driver's car – and prettier – but they're not ten times the product.

The Wraith is a hit, in other words, capable of both enchanting and involving all who drive it.

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