Volkswagen's next-generation Golf will usher in a new era of mild hybrid powertrains when it is revealed towards the end of next year
30 October 2015

The next Volkswagen Golf, which is due to be revealed late next year, will bring with it the first solid evidence of Volkswagen's new electrification strategy, ushering in an era of new super-frugal mild hybrid powertrains.

Insiders predict the new Golf will feature a new 48V petrol hybrid system as its main powertrain option - a strategy which could be particularly effective in the US market, where VW’s ‘clean diesel’ aspirations look dead in the water in the wake of its emissions scandal.

The Mk8 Golf will arrive at the same time as facelifted versions of its VW Group sister cars, the Seat Leon and Skoda Octavia.

The initial overhaul of the MQB architecture was well under way before the diesel emissions scandal hit the company. The aim was to reduce the expense of an architecture that many analysts (and rival car makers) believe has been over-engineered for the price points of the vehicles it underpins.

Targeting a ‘real-world’ 60mpg, the new mild hybrid powertrain is thought to be based on the company’s new turbocharged 1.0-litre three-cylinder petrol engine, with the addition of an electrically driven supercharger and a combined starter motor/generator. A low-cost lead-acid battery is used to store recovered energy, such as when the car is braking.

Unlike a conventional hybrid transmission, which uses a full-size electric motor, these 48V mild hybrids provide assistance to the petrol engine via the oversized starter motor/generator. The belt that connects the starter motor to the engine’s crank pulley is also used to assist the engine when extra power and torque are needed. The process can be reversed to allow the engine’s crank pulley to turn the starter motor/generator when the car is slowing down. 

This recovered energy is not used just to assist the engine. It is also used to power a small supercharger that’s driven by an electric motor. By powering the blower electrically, rather than relying on engine and exhaust gas speed to drive it, it can boost the engine’s performance from very low revs.

These two forms of electrical assistance allow the engine of a 48V hybrid to be significantly downsized, enabling a 1.0-litre three-pot Golf to offer brisk performance and impressive economy.

Insiders say the new 48V hybrid system should be competitive on cost with a modern EU6-rated diesel engine, because it doesn’t use a full-size electric motor or an expensive lithium ion battery. This is particularly relevant now that VW has announced that expensive urea injection systems are likely to be fitted to Golf-class diesel models.

A number of automotive and component companies are meeting next month in Düsseldorf to rubber stamp the final industry-wide technical specs for these 48V hybrids.

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Comments
19

TS7

30 October 2015
... seeeing '8' and 'V' in the same letter group. Read more carefully and it's the usual eurofag ecomentalist clap-trap.

30 October 2015
A turbocharger, a supercharger AND a new electrical assistance system in a VW? Nothing to go wrong there.

31 October 2015
winniethewoo wrote:
A turbocharger, a supercharger AND a new electrical assistance system in a VW? Nothing to go wrong there.
Yep, nothing at all until 4,000 miles.

30 October 2015
This sounds like a very low cost approach to electrification just so that Volkswagen can stick a "hybrid" badge on the Golf. Unless the battery and electric motor are sufficiently powerful, there may not be much benefit beyond that realised during the official EU test procedure. And a lead acid battery combined with a 48v motor generator doesn't sound promising. Indeed, this sounds a relatively crude system against Toyota hybrids, whose benefits also rely on Atkinson cycle petrol engines, CVT transmissions as well as a much heavier duty batteries and electric motors.

30 October 2015
Will this really be the 8th generation Golf. If so, it will make the current 7th gen model (introduced in late 2012) the shortest ever running. Given the Volkswagen's massive investment in its MQB platform and its current financial woes, a significant facelift next year would seem more likely.

30 October 2015
'turbocharged, electrically driven supercharger and a hybrid' in what's mean't to be at the end of the day a form of slightly above average-quality family transport. The MK8 EV golf will end up having a lower sticker price and be alot cheaper to run!

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

30 October 2015
I'll be amazed if this an all-new, 8th generation Golf as the current model was only launched in 2012 as LP in Brighton mentioned. Will this mean there'll also be a new A3, Octavia and Leon then as these cars and the Golf are all launched within 12 months or so of each other as part of the VW Groups small car line-up?

30 October 2015
The MQB is a kit of parts, in there for the long haul. The cosmetic bits, that customers see, is what will change. I thought this was the whole point of MQB, to allow the chassis (most expensive to engineer) to stay unchanged over a long period of cosmetic/panel changes/different models in the group. Quite right they should call it Mk8. I don't fancy a Mk7.5.

30 October 2015
Roadster wrote:
.... Will this mean there'll also be a new A3, Octavia and Leon then as these cars and the Golf are all launched within 12 months .?
Nope the A3 might get a minor face lift next year but won't there won't be a new one for at least 3 more years

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

30 October 2015
Roadster wrote:
I'll be amazed if this an all-new, 8th generation Golf as the current model was only launched in 2012 as LP in Brighton mentioned. Will this mean there'll also be a new A3, Octavia and Leon then as these cars and the Golf are all launched within 12 months or so of each other as part of the VW Groups small car line-up?
I bet it will be more of a facelift (same chassis and overall architecture) with the engine tech upgraded for forthcoming EU regs in 2021. By 2020 they need 95% compliance to the 2021 deadline of having 95g/km CO2 average emissions across the range. For obvious reasons VW wont be able to introduce new tech to its entire range in a single year just before the deadline... it will have to be phased in over a number of years. You can look forward to a cascade of new tech introduced by all manufacturers in the next 5 years.

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