New system being trialled by drivers in Ingolstadt

Audi is hoping to save motorists time at car park barriers by piloting a wireless payment scheme.

Using a Radio Frequency Identification transmitter fitted to the car, Audi hopes its models will be able to communicate with car park barriers, granting faster access via wireless payments and thus saving time.

Trials for the technology are currently underway in the marque’s hometown of Ingolstadt in Germany. Up to 13,000 cars could be connected as part of the pilot, which Audi sees as the first step towards the widespread integration of its technology into its model range.

When drivers have entered a car park they can also choose to hand control of parking over to the car. Although still in the prototype stage at the moment, Audi is also developing a piloted parking programme based on the wireless connection between the car and the car park. 

The system would enable the car to find the nearest available parking space and guide itself to park. It would be controlled via a smartphone app that would be downloaded by owners. 

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