Reports suggest entry-level sports car concept will offer 128bhp and be pitched against rivals such as the Mazda MX-5
28 October 2015

The Toyota S-FR sports car concept has been revealed at the Tokyo motor show.

The car's specifications have been leaked on an online forum and suggest the S-FR will be powered by a 1.5-litre four-cylinder petrol engine producing 128bhp and 109lb ft of torque. The engine will be coupled to a six-speed manual transmission, with no automatic option available. The car should be capable of returning up to 55mpg, and weighs just 980kg.

By comparison, the entry-level Mazda MX-5 is powered by a 129bhp 1.5-litre petrol engine, allowing it to reach 62mph in 8.3 seconds, with a top speed of 127mph.

The S-FR concept is described as being a 'fun-to-drive lightweight sports car' and is pitched as an entry-level model, which means any production variant would sit underneath the current GT86. Its dimensions make the S-FR significantly shorter, narrower and lower than the current GT86, with a smaller wheelbase.

Toyota says the front-engined, rear-wheel-drive coupé offers 'smooth, responsive and direct handling that gives a real sense of communication between car and driver.' The concept has been envisioned with future tuning and customisation in mind and features a pared-back interior with a digital instrument cluster and very few buttons inside.

If the S-FR makes it to production, it will give Toyota a three-strong sports car line-up, sitting alongside the current GT86 and the planned Supra successor - which is currently being co-developed with BMW. The leaked specifications suggest a price of around $12,500 for the S-FR in Japan. It's currently unknown whether the car would come to the UK.

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Comments
14

8 October 2015

It sounds as though it would be more in line with Mini than BMW philosophy. For once it would actually be mini, if you know what I mean?

12 October 2015

OK, so FR-S is the US name. But, really, doesn't Toyota have any better imagination when it comes to names?

8 October 2015

But not the execution, which looks more "Noddy car" than what a more smaller, affordable GT86 might be like. Maybe I'm just too old for it, or perhaps Toyota isn't too keen to replicate the success of the 86?
Come on, it's about time the MX5 had some competition!

8 October 2015

This thing looks hideous, like some kind of automotive wide-mouthed frog. How about a sports car actually being good looking rather than an automotive Elephant Man.

MG Writer

8 October 2015

Looks like a pedal-car Ferrari! Ugh.

8 October 2015

I love this! Make it please Toyota :D

8 October 2015

Except for the guppy front grill. Nothing an aftermarket tuner won't sort out I'm sure. Refreshing to see a ²concept car" on sensible size wheels though.

8 October 2015

Come on Honda, get some in. I'm sure that small sports cars could be popular again, if only they were relatively affordable and looked good. I'd buy one for a start - but not this Noddy car Toyota...

8 October 2015

The interior is great. That bit different without forcing novelty for the sake of it. Likewise the styling outside is neat and unfussy with a hint of individuality and a soupçon of 2000 GT - have a look at that front-on shot alongside a 2000 GT with the headlights popped-up - the influence is clear. If Toyota keep the realization realistic, small engine, small wheels and tyres, low weight, low price, they could be on to something utterly massive here.

I don't need to put my name here, it's on the left

 

8 October 2015

It is an interesting concept, and I like the interior, but the exterior doesn't quite work. Normally concept cars look great, then the production version doesn't match up to it. Maybe this will do the opposite.

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