Electric vehicle drivers in the UK will benefit from a new 74-point charging network that covers a stretch of more than 680 miles
25 February 2016

A new 683-mile electric vehicle charging network has been completed in the UK, bringing rapid-charging stations within easy reach of more drivers.

The network, installed by Rapid Charge Network, consists of 74 rapid charging points, which are capable of charging a vehicle’s battery to 80% of capacity in 30 minutes.

The network has been designed to give drivers of electric vehicles more freedom, making long-distance journeys easier. The charging points are also situated around busy transport hubs, enabling EV drivers to cross UK borders.

According to research conducted by Newcastle University, 72% of EV drivers would use rapid chargers. The network covers from Stranraer in Scotland, to Suffolk in the east of England, Hull in Yorkshire to Holyhead in northwest Wales, and connects to Belfast in Northern Ireland and Dublin in the Republic of Ireland.

Renault's electric vehicle product manager, Ben Fletcher, said: “Electric vehicle sales are rising strongly as both vehicle technologies and the nationwide charging infrastructure take major strides forward. Investments such as the Rapid Charge Network are vital for maintaining the momentum and encouraging more motorists to go electric.”

A spokesperson from Volkswagen UK said: “We and our electric vehicle customers will welcome the development of a network of multi-standard charge points. Each charge point on the network is compatible with all standard EVs on sale today, taking away the element of confusion for drivers and providing reassurance that they can rapid charge regardless of make or model.”

The £5.8m investment was part-funded by the European Union and by vehicle manufacturers; Nissan, BMW, Renault and Volkswagen. The project is part of a wider pan-European investment of £20.8m.

Danni Bagnall

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Comments
5

25 February 2016
So should we celebrate the introduction of 74 fast charging points across the UK when for petrol and diesel we have over 8000 filling stations that probably average 6 or more individual pumps that can refill any car within 2 minutes compared with an 80% fill in 30 minutes for an electric car. I expect the introduction of these 74 fast chargers has only come about due to some tapayers money being involved unlike the 50,000 or do fuel pumps supplied by oil companies and garage owners at zero cost to the taxpayer.

25 February 2016
I expect that there are far more places to charge electric cars in the UK than there are fuel pumps. The nearly £6bn a year of subsidies paid to the oil industry by the UK government ultimately comes from the taxpayer too.

26 February 2016
I have at least 30 charging point in my home but no petrol/diesel pumps. The point, most people would charge their plug-in for 95% of their driving needs at home, unless the charging point is free of course. Going forward that'll only increase with increased range. Any Leaf/Telsa/i3 owners care to comment?

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

26 February 2016
So nothing at all for the southwest, northeast or Scotland, doesn't seem worthy of celebration to me.

26 February 2016
si73 wrote:
So nothing at all for the southwest, northeast or Scotland, doesn't seem worthy of celebration to me.
"The network covers from Stranraer in Scotland"

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

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