All 375 examples of the 903bhp McLaren P1 have now been built, as attention turns to the car's planned succesor
Darren Moss
10 December 2015

The final McLaren P1 hypercar has rolled off the production line at McLaren's Woking headquarters, bringing to an end the planned production run of 375 cars.

The ending of P1 road car production at Woking leaves just one car in McLaren's 'Ultimate Series' range of cars: the 986bhp P1 GTR, production of which is due to end early next year. From then on, attentions will turn to the P1's successor, which is unlikely to appear before 2020. 

2016 Geneva Motorshow: McLaren hint that next generation P1 hypercar could be fully-electric

Speaking about the future of the Ultimate Series, McLaren boss Mike Flewitt said: "The McLaren P1 has already established itself as an icon, and any car that is to continue the lineage of the Ultimate Series will need to be a worthy successor - a significant step-change in technology or performance is required to ensure this is the case. The future is undecided at this stage, which is an exciting proposition."

The P1 was first shown as a design study at the Paris motor show in 2012, before being seen in final production form at the Geneva show in 2013. All of the planned 375 cars were sold before the car entered production in the summer of 2013, with the price tag set at £866,000.

Powering the P1 is McLaren's now staple 3.8-litre twin-turbo V8 engine, which produces 727bhp and 531lb ft of torque. The engine is mated to two electric motors, which boost total outputs to 903bhp and 664lb ft. The P1 is capable of reaching 62mph from a standing start in 2.8sec and has a top speed of 217mph.

The P1 quickly became part of a hypercar triumvirate which also included the 950bhp Ferrari LaFerrari and 875bhp Porsche 918 Spider. The three models are now known as the 'holy trinity' to owners.

Only two P1s are currently on sale in the UK, both on the used car market. The first only has delivery mileage and is being offered by luxury car company Prindiville for £1.8 million. The second is being offered by Coutts Automobiles for £2m.

In total, 21 examples of the P1 were built for development and product testing prior to the main production run of 375 cars. A total of 800 hours were used to complete the production run, shared between 105 people. Europe accounted for 26% of the production run, with America taking the lion's share, at 34%.

Watch our full video road test of the P1 in the video below.

Our Verdict

McLaren P1

The stakes couldn't be higher, so has the P1 risen to the challenge?

Join the debate

Comments
5

10 December 2015
The P1 has obviously done quite well for itself......perhaps even better than La Ferrari. If only the 918 hadn't shown up at exactly the same time.....

10 December 2015
Liked this car from the outset. IMO and without driving any it is better than the Laf or 918, as it strikes the best balance even if the Ferrari looks better to some eyes and employs a naturally aspirated engine. The word for the P1 is purposeful.

ofir

10 December 2015
I don't knw Ofir, I quite like the 918. I wasn't fussed on it until I seen it on Top Gear, and I was impressed with it. All that power, and yet still looked like a great car to drive to the shops in. I don't think that there is a bad one between the 3, mind.

Well done McLaren for making the car though. Can't believe it has built them all already!

10 December 2015
Please correct the typo in the title sentence.

11 December 2015
The P1 is a sensational car and a technical marvel too combined with staggering performance and capabilities. And yet, IMO, it hasn't capture the imagination, stirred the soul or move the hypercar game on in the way its predecessor did. Perhaps that's because the P1 arrived at the same time as the equally staggering LaFerrari and 918 while the F1 at the time had no peers, moving the game on so far beyond the XJ220 before it that it took years before rivals caught up. Plus the ethos behind the F1's design and engineering too was purer and had more focus and purpose than the P1's.

11 December 2015
The P1 is a sensational car and a technical marvel too combined with staggering performance and capabilities. And yet, IMO, it hasn't capture the imagination, stirred the soul or move the hypercar game on in the way its predecessor did. Perhaps that's because the P1 arrived at the same time as the equally staggering LaFerrari and 918 while the F1 at the time had no peers, moving the game on so far beyond the XJ220 before it that it took years before rivals caught up. Plus the ethos behind the F1's design and engineering too was purer and had more focus and purpose than the P1's.

Add your comment

Log in or register to post comments

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week

  • Citroën C3 Aircross
    First Drive
    17 October 2017
    The Citroen C3 Aircross has got funky looks and a charming interior, but it's another small SUV, and another dynamic miss. Numb steering is just one thing keeping it from class best
  • Skoda-Karoq 2.0 TDI 4x4
    First Drive
    16 October 2017
    Diesel version of Skoda’s junior SUV is unobtrusive and undemanding, but we’d still go for the silkier petrol version of the Karoq
  • Audi Q7 e-tron
    First Drive
    16 October 2017
    Expensive and flawed but this understated diesel-electric Audi Q7 has a lot to offer
  • Citroën C3
    First Drive
    16 October 2017
    Is the third gen Citroën C3 ‘fresh and different’ enough to take on its supermini rivals? We spend six months with one to find out
  • BMW X3
    First Drive
    15 October 2017
    A satisfying rework of the X3 that usefully improves its handling, cabin finish, space and connectivity to make this BMW a class front-runner again