Chancellor announces zero per cent rate for the next five years
9 December 2009

Chancellor Alistair Darling has announced a zero per cent company car tax on electric vehicles in today's pre-budget report.

Darling wants to stimulate the market for greener vehicles by making them more attractive to businesses, as well as encouraging the set-up of charging infrastructure and providing an incentive for car makers to build electric cars.

The zero per cent rate will run for the next five years. By the end of this period, electric cars should be mass-produced and a more common site on Britain's roads

At present there are only 50 electric vehicles registered as company cars, out of 1.1 million company cars on the road. Company car tax rates start from around nine per cent for an electric vehicle.

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17

8 December 2009

I smell a big fat stinking rat!

Out of that 1.1million, how many of those cars will not be needed for trips over 100 on a regular (and in most cases daily) basis!?

This is just a massive ploy so that they can raise the tax level on cars that are now falling under the governments requirements and thus falling in to increasingly lower tax brackets (costing the government money).

They will say "we are raising the tax because there is an alternative option of 0% tax availible." while knowing that the cars that fall in to that 0% bracket are totally unable to do the job that 99.9% of company car users need them to do!

I dont have company car, so i am in no way biased in this, but having seen what brown nose and eyebrows darling have done in the past, there is never EVER something given, that isnt then taken away 50 fold!

8 December 2009

This is a great thing and well done AD and GB for that matter:

1) They are making the UK a great place for the electric vehicle and as such they should very much be able to retain a great advantage for the Sunderland plant re. the Leaf :-)))

2) Many campanies have pool cars, have cars that do not go 100 miles in a day and the electric cars for this are great, also any inner city and or town etc delivery, taxis cabs, this will be brilliant :-))))

3) I suspect the Chevy Volt falls under this scheme and thus anyone that travels vast mileage can gain benefit from a chevy volt - :-)))

4) The Nissan Leaf for instance has a 100 mile range and only a 15 minute charge time on three phase for 80% charge top up (an extra 80 miles); thus say for me that goes to another company for a meeting, i can get a range of 180 miles which is ample, if i go to London or have a meeting in another city centre i use the train anyway; its easier than driving :-)))

5) The Leaf only takes 30mins to get 80% of it charge from a domestic supply :-))))

6) Other electric cars will be similar (with varying ranges), the Tesla S i think has a range of 400 miles on one charge :-))))

7) This is a great thing, well done AD and GB! and this is a great welcome to a low carbon economy! :-)))))

8) It will accelerate the infrastructure for the UK and this is a great move round :-)))))

What is not to like :-)))))) - mind you I am sure some folks still think the world is flat and thus probably will not like this, but well done AD and GB!! (its great for the UK)

8 December 2009

I disagree with almost everything you have said!

1) no real arguement,

2) Pool cars will not fall under this taxation i wouldnt think, Taxis are arguably one of the worst possible uses for the electric cars, especially in city centres! They need to run constantly for 8-10 hrs, start stop driving in citys will drain the power faster. i would be surprised if somthing like a LEAF was capable of getting across rush hour london 3 times without a charge!

3) I very much doubt any car that has a petrol tank will fall under this taxation (regardless of how it uses it)

4) Correction a maximum range of 100 i love the idea of running out of power while in a traffic jam on the M25 (yes you could argue the same about a car with fuel in it, but if i am on the M25 i make sure i have at least 100miles worth of fuel when i get there not before i start!) , give me a choise keep the heater on or run out of power, nice idea in the middle of winter! 15 mins to charge to 80% if that is the case then thats great, personally i will beleive it when i see it! Trains are not a viable option in many cases for company car drivers, i tried to book a train to manchester (over a month before the trip) and they wanted £145 ONE WAY!

5) agian if this is true then great, but i dont like the idea of the batteries life having power shoved in to it like that. (though i accept this may improve in time)

6) perfect for driving in a straight line at a constant speed with a tail wind on the flat (on our main roads, stopping and starting, give over!

7) Low carbon??? Batteries from china (increadbly hard to get rid off), aliminum from bauxite and power from Coal fired Power stations! Again i dont see it!

8) I agree it will, but are we investing in the wrong infrastructure!? personally i think we are.

Dont get me wrong i think cars like the Volt are a very good idea (at least as a stop gap while we develop hydrogen) but a straight EV only has one purpose and that is a city centre for the lazy git who wont walk or get public transport. as a company car for the majority the are woefully inadequate .

8 December 2009

[quote Widescreen]This is a great thing and well done AD and GB for that matter:

1) They are making the UK a great place for the electric vehicle and as such they should very much be able to retain a great advantage for the Sunderland plant re. the Leaf :-)))

2) Many campanies have pool cars, have cars that do not go 100 miles in a day and the electric cars for this are great, also any inner city and or town etc delivery, taxis cabs, this will be brilliant :-))))

3) I suspect the Chevy Volt falls under this scheme and thus anyone that travels vast mileage can gain benefit from a chevy volt - :-)))

4) The Nissan Leaf for instance has a 100 mile range and only a 15 minute charge time on three phase for 80% charge top up (an extra 80 miles); thus say for me that goes to another company for a meeting, i can get a range of 180 miles which is ample, if i go to London or have a meeting in another city centre i use the train anyway; its easier than driving :-)))

5) The Leaf only takes 30mins to get 80% of it charge from a domestic supply :-))))

6) Other electric cars will be similar (with varying ranges), the Tesla S i think has a range of 400 miles on one charge :-))))

7) This is a great thing, well done AD and GB! and this is a great welcome to a low carbon economy! :-)))))

8) It will accelerate the infrastructure for the UK and this is a great move round :-)))))

What is not to like :-)))))) - mind you I am sure some folks still think the world is flat and thus probably will not like this, but well done AD and GB!! (its great for the UK)

[/quote]

This is surely CapsLock in disguise? Have you changed your moniker, CapsLock?

8 December 2009

[quote Widescreen]

This is a great thing and well done AD and GB for that matter:

1) They are making the UK a great place for the electric vehicle and as such they should very much be able to retain a great advantage for the Sunderland plant re. the Leaf :-)))

2) Many campanies have pool cars, have cars that do not go 100 miles in a day and the electric cars for this are great, also any inner city and or town etc delivery, taxis cabs, this will be brilliant :-))))

3) I suspect the Chevy Volt falls under this scheme and thus anyone that travels vast mileage can gain benefit from a chevy volt - :-)))

4) The Nissan Leaf for instance has a 100 mile range and only a 15 minute charge time on three phase for 80% charge top up (an extra 80 miles); thus say for me that goes to another company for a meeting, i can get a range of 180 miles which is ample, if i go to London or have a meeting in another city centre i use the train anyway; its easier than driving :-)))

5) The Leaf only takes 30mins to get 80% of it charge from a domestic supply :-))))

6) Other electric cars will be similar (with varying ranges), the Tesla S i think has a range of 400 miles on one charge :-))))

7) This is a great thing, well done AD and GB! and this is a great welcome to a low carbon economy! :-)))))

8) It will accelerate the infrastructure for the UK and this is a great move round :-)))))

What is not to like :-)))))) - mind you I am sure some folks still think the world is flat and thus probably will not like this, but well done AD and GB!! (its great for the UK)

[/quote]

Clearly Allistar Darling - and you have only ever made one post - this! Until there are millions of charging points electric won't take off - and also where does electricity come from - our national grid can barely cope with the current demand for electric - so if we go to electric cars billions will need to be spent either on new power stations or we go nuclear!

8 December 2009

Pure electric cars will never be "green" until the majority of mains electricity is generated without burning fossil fuels. In the meantime they have the potential to increase co2 output.

(I am not claiming that co2 is actually harmful )

8 December 2009

The intention is good, but the practicality is questionable.

Not many company car/car allowance drivers will be able to accept the limited long distance practicality of the cars that will be available in the next few years.

The type of cars will suit the second car/ school run / shopping trolley market, or the retired who do low mileages.

If they are serious about attracting large numbers of potential buyers the Government need to zero rate the VAT on these cars to offset the high initial cost of ownership, and do the same for battery replacement to control the long term cost running them.

9 December 2009

Darling is a massive idiot, who is completely out of touch with real life!

I watched about 10 mins of his PMQ speech and had to avoid putting my fist though my computer screen!

I know its always been the case, and i know the Torys will do the same, but does anyone else find it intensly irritating when they keep bleeting on about what happened in "the early 90's" or "prior to 1997"? I dont give a stuff what happened 15-20 years ago, what i want to know is what you are going to do about tomorrow?!!!!!

Sorry my mistake, you dont care because you wont be in power in 6 months time!!

rant over, sorry to stray off topic! :)

9 December 2009

[quote Old But not yet Dead]The intention is good, but the practicality is questionable.[/quote]

I agree. As a personal car, I reckon my partner and I could easily cope with an electric car. We have a drive which could have a plug point, my work is under 5 miles away, my partners is 12 miles away. The range an electric car provides would suit our needs for town work.

However, in my job, I cover the whole of scotland and north england. Today, I started from the office in edinburgh and went to pailsey/glasgow. Yesterday I was in newcastle, and tomorrow I could be anywhere as I never know until the end of the day. There is no way an electric car would cover me for my job until the recharging points are in place and take no more than 15 mins for a full charge of 150 miles minimum. So, 0% company car tax or not, I won't be going electric for work yet!

And then there is the small matter of the cost of the vehicle in the first place. I very much doubt that someone who runs a 3-series as a company car will be willing to change it for a mitsubishi i !!

9 December 2009

Hi All; firstly i am not CapLock, secondly i will respond to some of the aspects on here in a little while (the next couple of days are busy days) and thirdly:

1) The "well-to-wheel" emissions of electric vehicles are lower than those from gasoline internal combustion vehicles. California Air Resources Board studies show that battery electric vehicles emit at least 67% lower greenhouse gases than gasoline cars -- even more assuming renewables. A PHEV with only a 20-mile all-electric range is 62% lower (see printed page 95 in the 2004 study).

I hope this helps some folks i.e. WELL TO WHEEL; you see you cannot say "the grid produces Co2" without then using the same yard stick to the production of petrol i.e. the overall pollution of a car is not just its own ouput......

so here is a huge 67% lower greenhouse gases - i hope also you see why are very clever cousins (the US folks) stated in the clean air act "greenhouse gases".......hope that helps Vidge123 and i will respond to the rest later!....

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