London mayor to cut controversial western exention
27 November 2008

Boris Johnson will slash London’s congestion charge zone by half its size after announcing plans to abolish the controversial western extension, which was introduced by his predecessor Ken Livingstone last year.

It follows a public consultation that revealed 67 per cent of 28,000 local residents were in favour of scrapping the extension.

Johnson had pledged in his election manifesto to hold a consultation on the issue and act on the result.

“During the election I promised Londoners a genuine consultation on the future of the extension," said Johnson. “Londoners have spoken loud and clear, and the majority of people have said that they would like the scheme scrapped.”

Now the extension - which covers Kensington and Chelsea, Fulham and parts of Westminster - will be removed in early 2010. Relief could be offered at an earlier stage, with the possibility of enforcement holidays in the western extension area.

Johnson also plans to improve congestion in the area by re-phasing traffic lights to add more time on green for vehicles.

"One thing everybody should be assured of is my determination to make it easier for Londoners to get around our great city,” he said.

Critics of the move say it will deny Transport for London £70 million of revenue, but the true figure is expected to be closer to £20 million. The Mayor said the lost revenue could be found from TfL's £8.2 billion budget.

Will Powell

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3

27 November 2008

Makes the soon to be held congestion vote in Manchester look like a waste of council tax money which would have been better put towards public transport.

27 November 2008

Lets hope this politician listening to his electorate and applying common sense to an issue rather than ignoring the truth, lying and massaging figures to support their own corrupt and dare I say it facist ideals catchs on.

Well done Boris, and £70million back into the british economy to be spent on things we need like food and warmth rather than vast profits for the likes of Capita.

What a stupid corrupt little weasel Livingstone is. And Labour for that matter, disgusting thieves cut from the same cloth. Rob from eveyone rich and poor to give to .... well themselves, their friends and some poor people.

28 November 2008

One thing not mentioned is that TFL will have to pay a VERY large fine to Capita if the C-Charge extension is removed before 2012 - as they have a 5 year contract (around £70million)

Apparently this clause was part of the original deal to prevent a sucessor to Ken terminating the contract early - as Boris has just stated he will.

So it may actually end up costing Londoners quite alot of money in the long run: Reduced revenue, compensation to Capita and the labour costs of removing all the cameras and signs.

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