Council moves barrier designed to protect school children as cars keep hitting it
23 October 2009

A safety barrier installed to protect primary school children from passing motorists has been moved because it was repeatedly struck by cars.

Council officials were forced to move the four-foot high metal railing, designed to protect children from cars negotiating a tight bend outside Pensford Primary School, near Bristol, after it was hit four times in two years.

It has now been moved around 30 centimetres away from the roadside, into the middle of the pavement.

Dan Norris, Labour MP for Wansdyke, told The Daily Telegraph that he felt the decision was “extraordinary” and had put children at increased risk.

Tom, Sharpe

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Comments
8

23 October 2009

So here we have a clear case of needing to slow the traffic for this bend. I am sure there are already warning signs, maybe even a big SLOW written on the road. Perhaps they could install a speed camera here and a lower 40mph limit for this small stretch of road. This would improve safety, something these idiots keep banging on about. Instead .... no, they spend considerably more money moving the barrier right into the pavement. Genius.

24 October 2009

[quote Autocar]A safety barrier installed to protect primary school children from passing motorists has been moved because it was repeatedly struck by cars.[/quote]

I thought that was the idea - the cars are supposed to strike the barrier rather than striking the children. By moving the barrier into the middle of the pavement , are they leaving room for children to walk outside of it so that they will be crushed against the barrier ? How much are these council officials being payed to make such daft decisions ?

24 October 2009

Or, how about supplying the School with a cardboard cutout of a policeman with a speed gun which could be set up at the School's discretion! lol!

Peter Cavellini.

24 October 2009

Could the school be moved approximately 200 yards to away from the road?

This would enable a battery of road safety measures including, landmines for errant motorists, a police reaction force to deal with motorists who look like they 'may' just break the law and pockets of social workers to deal with the aftermath of the shock to children who had to witness an actual car going faster than 20 mph, .

Addition support from the military will be required, such as 2 Parachute Regiment put on standby to deploy to deal with attacks on the Lollopop Lady, as the police don't deal with antisocial matters. A local council official should be onstandby on site as Antisocial behaviour is their responisiblity.

Lets not forget the support facilities, such as messing and accommodation, forward operating zones and supply transfer points.

24 October 2009

[quote Uncle Mellow]I thought that was the idea[/quote]

Agreed. What's wrong with cars hitting the barrier? The drivers will learn their lesson and take more care next time.

26 October 2009

Is there any truth in the rumour that the same Council want to move the barrier on the central reservation of the M4 to the side of the motorway....as drivers have been known to collide with it in its current location?

26 October 2009

Anybody out there still not think the public sector has far too many jobsworths who deserve to be put on the dole rather than hoovering up our taxpayers money?

26 October 2009

[quote CambsBill]Anybody out there still not think the public sector has far too many jobsworths who deserve to be put on the dole rather than hoovering up our taxpayers money?[/quote]

Me!

There isn't one area of industry/business/publc sector etc that doesn't make a stupid decision at some tme or another. I don't hear people clamouring for mass redundancies in the other sectors. (And yes, you DO pay for them, through higher service/product prices)

The truth of it is that he general public has no idea of the contributon the public sector makes to their lives. It is totally taken for granted, until instances like this.

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