New compact SUV, based on Fiat 500L, priced from £16,995; features all-wheel drive and off-road credentials
Steve Cropley Autocar
16 December 2014

The new Jeep Renegade will be priced from £16,995 when order books open on 6 January next year.

Kicking off the 18-strong model range for the compact SUV is the front-wheel-drive 1.6 eTorq Evo 108bhp Sport. The flagship model is the four-wheel-drive 2.0 MJet 168bhp ‘Auto Low Trailhawk’, costing £27,995.

The quirky Jeep Renegade gets put through its paces on our thorough road test

Buyers get a choice of four different trim levels – Sport, Longitude, Limited and Trailhawk – with a choice of petrol or turbo diesel engines and in either front-wheel drive or four-wheel drive configurations. Four-wheel-drive versions are only available mated to Jeep's nine-speed automatic transmission.

Two petrol engines are offered: 168bhp turbo and 138bhp naturally aspirated versions of Fiat’s 1.4-litre MultiAir four-pot. Diesel engines come in the form of a 138bhp 1.6 and a 2.0-litre unit with 168bhp and 258lb ft of torque.

Standard equipment in the entry-level Sport model includes DAB radio with touchscreen and Bluetooth, air conditioning, 16-inch alloy wheels and an electric parking brake. Mid-range Longitude spec gains 17-inch alloy wheels, body-coloured door mirrors, cruise control and a six-speaker audio system.

The Limited version further adds 18-inch alloy wheels, heated front seats and steering wheel, leather upholstery and rear parking sensors. The halo Trailhawk model completes the line-up with dual-zone climate control and front suspension and fuel tank skid plates.

Jeep experts say the Trailhawk’s raised suspension and short overhangs give it best-in-class off-road capabilities.

A special ‘Opening Edition’ version limited to 200 units will also be available upon launch, in Alpine White or Omaha Orange with 18-inch alloy wheels.

Revealed at this year's Geneva motor show, the new Renegade’s styling draws heavily on the rugged, upright look of the traditional but recently revised Wrangler.

Designers say their aims were to make the most of the Renegade’s restricted overall length of 4.2m and to emphasise a contrast with the larger, lower and more family-orientated Cherokee, also launched recently. 

Despite the Renegade’s abrupt rear-end styling and short overhangs, it has been extensively tested in the wind tunnel and has a relatively low drag coefficient of 0.36.

Jeep bosses believe that buyers might even see a visual link with the original military jeep that has inspired all Jeep design since 1941, aided by the seven-slot vertical grille, high ground clearance, boxy lines and upright windscreen.

The body’s steel monocoque structure incorporates major components from the 500L and 500X. However, it uses new longitudinal members and new front and rear crossbeams to carry a new all-independent suspension system featuring MacPherson struts in front and Chapman struts behind.

First deliveries of the Jeep Renegade will arrive in mid-February.

Read our first drive review of the Jeep Renegade here.

Additional reporting by Aaron Smith

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Comments
6

A34

4 March 2014
... than Jeep Wrangler thats been in the rinse. Still, probably a useful size (circa Nissan Juke?). ..

26 July 2014
Hmm think you might need to proof read your articles a little better, a 4 speed manual? A non-turbo diesel? Are Jeep taking us back to the 70s?

16 December 2014
Is this supposed to compete with the Juke? If so, why is the starting point £3.5k higher..? And I don't get how you can spend £27k on this..


16 December 2014
'the new Renegade’s styling draws heavily on the rugged, upright look of the traditional but recently revised Wrangler.'........

One, its looks nothing like the Wrangler, and two, the Wrangler was last revised about 7 years ago............However, ignoring the silly stuff, it looks way too expensive.

16 December 2014
Come on Steve, get your facts right BOTH 1.4 petrols have turbos and the diesel range is 1.6 118 bhp and 138 and 168 bhp 2.0s, there is no 138 bhp 1.6 deisel, surely you should know this by now ? - all 5 engines have been around for years (a bit like you, lol).

16 December 2014
If imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, the Freight Rover Sherpa should be feeling very smug right now.

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