McLaren star likely to get small cash fine for hooning offence
25 May 2010

Lewis Hamilton will not have to appear in a Melbourne courtroom just two days before he is due to race in the Belgian Grand Prix.

The McLaren driver faces a charge of 'hooning' while at the wheel of a Mercedes road car, and will be sentenced at Melbourne Magistrates' Court on 24 August.

But a report in the Daily Telegraph says Hamilton will only need to pay "a small fine which can be paid by a local lawyer on his behalf".

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11

25 May 2010

The whole episode would appear now to be a bit of a 'storm in a teacup' which has been way over hyped.

25 May 2010

It seems a very poor way to treat a guest. I am very sorry that this has to happen. I am afraid Australia is declining into barbarism.

25 May 2010

Perfectly sensible and was always going to be the case. Assuming he is found guilty, he will be issued a fine which will hardly concern him.

The over-hyping is largely courtesy of the British media and those who think Hamilton is somehow above the law.

25 May 2010

Australia has more empty roads than any other country in the world, yet polices them in a more draconian way than any other country. Why? I guess bored policemen with nothing better to do need to justify their existence. But you'd think that the huge distances between towns and cities would justify slightly higher limits and greater tollerances when no one else is about. Anyway, as far as Lewis is concerned, whatever he did, saying that he wasn't in control of his car is utter tosh: he was in supreme control of it. Reminds me of the cop who stopped Ayrton Senna on the M40 in 1992 for doing well over a ton. When he was handed a speeding ticket by the policeman, he signed it: with best wishes, Ayrton and passed it back and drove off before anything else was said. I am sure said ticket is now worth much more than the fine it attempted to extract. i am equally certain that the cop has said ticket framed on his wall.

25 May 2010

All you little wusses happy now? Crying about it yesterday, sad, like little school kids, grow up. All is okay now, daddy Hamilton doesn't have to go to Australia. Those bad Australian men won't hurt him! Soft chaps.

25 May 2010

[quote brakedust]Australia has more empty roads than any other country in the world, yet polices them in a more draconian way than any other country. Why? I guess bored policemen with nothing better to do need to justify their existence. But you'd think that the huge distances between towns and cities would justify slightly higher limits and greater tollerances when no one else is about. Anyway, as far as Lewis is concerned, whatever he did, saying that he wasn't in control of his car is utter tosh: he was in supreme control of it. Reminds me of the cop who stopped Ayrton Senna on the M40 in 1992 for doing well over a ton. When he was handed a speeding ticket by the policeman, he signed it: with best wishes, Ayrton and passed it back and drove off before anything else was said. I am sure said ticket is now worth much more than the fine it attempted to extract. i am equally certain that the cop has said ticket framed on his wall.[/quote] So, it's okay to do over 100 is it? As long as you are Ayrton Senna. What happens if something fails on the car, like with the Williams he was driving? If that happened on the road many people could have been killed or seriously injured. The usual double standards when it comes to anything concerning Senna. [quote brakedust]Anyway, as far as Lewis is concerned, whatever he did, saying that he wasn't in control of his car is utter tosh: he was in supreme control of it. [/quote] So, I assume you were there to view it, were you?

DWH

25 May 2010

[quote brakedust]Australia has more empty roads than any other country in the world, yet polices them in a more draconian way than any other country. Why? I guess bored policemen with nothing better to do need to justify their existence. But you'd think that the huge distances between towns and cities would justify slightly higher limits and greater tollerances when no one else is about. Anyway, as far as Lewis is concerned, whatever he did, saying that he wasn't in control of his car is utter tosh: he was in supreme control of it. Reminds me of the cop who stopped Ayrton Senna on the M40 in 1992 for doing well over a ton. When he was handed a speeding ticket by the policeman, he signed it: with best wishes, Ayrton and passed it back and drove off before anything else was said. I am sure said ticket is now worth much more than the fine it attempted to extract. i am equally certain that the cop has said ticket framed on his wall.[/quote]

You're an idiot. If you knew anything about Oz - and you certainly don't, you would know that Melbourne has traffic levels on a par with any city in the UK and I know the area where the race takes place. Lewis knew he'd done a stupid thing, how come you can't?

26 May 2010

[quote Martin153]It seems a very poor way to treat a guest. I am very sorry that this has to happen. I am afraid Australia is declining into barbarism.[/quote]

That is a very silly thing to say. Try doing what he did in say Singapore for example and you would see what barbarism is. Were you aware that you can be jailed in Singapore for chewing gum in public?

Fool

26 May 2010

[quote DWH]Melbourne has traffic levels on a par with any city in the UK[/quote]

And that's saying nothing of those pesky trams...major junctions in down town Melbourne in the middle of rush hour, stuck over a tram line in traffic- nightmare! Luckily my tinted glass in the Falcon UTE concealed my humiliation :)

26 May 2010

[quote disco.stu]The over-hyping is largely courtesy of the British media and those who think Hamilton is somehow above the law.[/quote] Quite so. '24 year old gets ticket for silly driving shocker'. Hardly draconian . Seems plenty fair to me. Silly sod. We've all been there though.

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