From £17,4107
The Mazda CX-3 has style and substance, and deserves consideration for anyone wanting a compact urban SUV. Here’s hoping Mazda gets the price and equipment right

Our Verdict

Mazda CX-3
Mazda CX-3 shares much with its Mazda 2 baby brother

Mazda goes Juke hunting, with its Skyactiv-generation baby SUV

  • First Drive

    2015 Mazda CX-3 Skyactiv-G 120 UK review

    We've driven the CX-3 abroad, now it's time to see how Mazda's new small SUV responds to the unique demands of the UK's roads
  • First Drive

    2015 Mazda CX-3 review

    The Mazda CX-3 has style and substance, and deserves consideration for anyone wanting a compact urban SUV.
12 December 2014

What is it?

The highly anticipated baby brother to the Mazda CX-5 SUV. It joins one of the fastest-growing segments of the new car market: pint-sized crossovers designed for the city rather than the great outdoors.

Huge sales for the Nissan Juke, Vauxhall Mokka and, more recently, the Citröen C4 Cactus prove there's strong demand for high-riding hatchbacks that give a commanding view of the road ahead but can still fit neatly into a tight parking space.

The Mazda CX-3 won't be short of rivals, with new arrivals including the Fiat 500X, Honda HR-V, Jeep Renegade and the new generation Suzuki Vitara.

Underneath, the CX-3 is largely based on the Mazda 2; even the dashboard is the same. The CX-3 is slightly wider than the supermini, although the wheelbase is identical. It has more headroom than a Mazda 3 (which is compromised by its sloping rear roofline), but the CX-3’s 264-litre boot capacity slots between that of the Mazda 2 (250 litres) and Mazda 3 (364 litres).

The CX-3 was designed in Mazda’s styling studio in Japan. When management was shown the full-size clay model for the first time they were reportedly so impressed they simply said “build that”. The styling really does help it stand out, especially at the front, and it's certainly nowhere near as awkward to look at as the Juke or Jeep Renegade.

The interior may be carried over from the Mazda 2 but it’s a classy, relatively roomy design. First impressions, then, are good.

What's it like?

There was a choice of two different engines during our world-first preview drive, held at a demanding private test track about 75 miles south-west of Melbourne. The the special access comes courtesy of the huge boom in Mazda's SUV sales in the Australian market, driven by the CX-5.

The first car we drove came with a 1.5-litre diesel engine (delivering 103bhp and 199lb ft) with on-demand all-wheel drive, fitted to a high-spec CX-3 riding on 18-inch alloys.

The diesel is relatively refined but lacked oomph when moving off from rest. Once you're on the move, though, it keeps up a comfortable pace without much effort, with decent in-gear flexibility and a broad spread of torque. The optional six-speed automatic gearbox changed down gears fairly intuitively for quick bursts of acceleration and overtakes.

There are no official performance or economy figures at this stage, but thanks to its clever Skyactiv fuel saving tech the same motor in the Mazda 2 comes in below 90g/km for CO2, so even with four-wheel drive and an automatic 'box, the CX-3 promises to be a cheap car to run.

The little Mazda strikes a fair balance between nice steering feel and decent ride comfort over bumps, even on the large alloys of our test car. Indeed, the CX-3 drives with the same confidence and stability as a hatchback, and doesn’t have the topsy-turvy body roll or poor composure of some SUVs.

Next up was the 2.0-litre petrol-engined front-wheel-drive version. It certainly felt a lot quicker off the line than the diesel, even though it promises fuel economy of around 50mpg (with the automatic gearbox). It also rode on 16-inch wheels, which gave a more compliant ride, and the steering felt a bit sharper (possibly aided by the slight weight advantage it enjoys over the diesel).

Downsides? There aren’t many we could find. Road noise is a common bugbear of Mazdas, and, like its big brother, the CX-3 has its fair share, but after a short drive it's fair to say that refinement is average for the class rather than poor.

The stability control was well sorted, even on a road covered in fine gravel, although when the ESC does step in the intervention felt a little abrupt.

Should I buy one?

The CX-3 has all the ingredients to succeed in the cut-throat world of crossovers. The design, sharp handling and frugal engines all make it worthy of consideration, and it should be a strong contender when it arrives in the UK next summer.

Faced with a choice between the two engines, we'd say go with petrol power all the way, especially if you only plan to drive in town. It’s said to be almost as efficient as the diesel, and will likely be cheaper to buy. The added sweetener is that the petrol CX-3 is more fun to drive, too.

Josh Dowling

 

Mazda CX-3 Skyactiv-D 1.5

Price From £14,500 (est); 0-62mph 11.0sec (est); Top speed 115mph (est); Economy 58mpg (est); CO2 105g/km; Kerb weight na; Engine 4 cyls, 1497cc, turbodiesel Power 103bhp at 4000rpm, 147lb ft at 1600 to 2500rpm, Gearbox Six-spd automatic

Join the debate

Comments
11

12 December 2014

Best look small crossover out there. Mazda really are on a roll just now.

12 December 2014

I agree - Like the Mazda 6, another successful design from Mazda. BMW & Merc take note!

12 December 2014

like it. but why do they take sooo long between these initial drives and sales? The mrs would like this NOW, next summer is too late, so it looks like a 2008 will take her cash. Shame, this looks sharp.

12 December 2014

Please don't get a 2008. Don't they look awful to you ? Beaky and under wheeled with that really horrid bit of metal over the rear door. 2008's look really cheap and rushed to me. Typical Peugeot. They should be ashamed of themselves. If ever a company botched it's image and reputation it's them. Now the Cactus looks superb. Modern, Different. Cool. The Mokka like a mini Merc and this...well...looks simply gorgeous.

japester

12 December 2014
japes wrote:

Please don't get a 2008. Don't they look awful to you ? Beaky and under wheeled with that really horrid bit of metal over the rear door. 2008's look really cheap and rushed to me. Typical Peugeot. They should be ashamed of themselves. If ever a company botched it's image and reputation it's them. Now the Cactus looks superb. Modern, Different. Cool. The Mokka like a mini Merc and this...well...looks simply gorgeous.

Don't think I'd go that far... the 308 range is a far better representation of Peugeot's renaissance, as is the standard 208.


"Work hard and be nice to people"

12 December 2014

Saw my first Mazda 3 today and it looked great.

I like the Cactus but don't know if I'd sink my own cash into one plus I'd be interested in checking out a 500x but the CX3 is my current favourite crossover.

13 December 2014

This looks superb. I don't like most of the compact SUVs flooding the market, but this really is impressive. The exterior looks great in every photo - stick a Lexus badge on it and no one would doubt it. Even better, the high quality design continues inside. I don't care if some of the plastics are hard, all the touch points look soft (is that artifical leather on the instrument cowl and above the glovebox) and providing it is well screwed together and stands the test of time, that's what really matters. All this combined with simple, sensibly sized and efficient petrol engines, and a strong driving experience makes this a compelling package.

jer

13 December 2014

But am I the only one disappointed its based on the super mini sized 2 and not the larger more practical 3 ? I think it could be just too small. But it bodes well for the next CX5. In the motor industry its critical that the execs have instinks and intuition for what's a seller Mazda has it other dont e.g. Ford and peugeot for a time at least. Other industries could take note.

14 December 2014

From £14,500, really, the Mazda 3 starts from £17,000 for a manual 1.5 petrol. If you gonna estimate surely you could make a more accurate one. I reckon they're at least £3,000 out for this version

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

15 December 2014

No official performance or economy figures, and no official price, yet you saddle it with a 31/2 star review. Don't you think you should withhold the stars until you are better informed?

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