The last convertible car that Maserati produced before the GranCabrio was the Spyder. It was based on the 2001 Coupé and had just two seats. 

Before the GranCabrio, the only other four-seat convertible Maseratis were produced by two coachbuilding firms in the 1930s. The Italian firm Castagna and British company RAG Patents both used Maserati’s 26M as the starting point for their convertibles.  

Road test editor
The GranCabrio's V8 is one of the best sounding in the business

So officially, this is the first time that Maserati has produced a four-seat convertible. Maserati does have a rich heritage in elegant open-top sports cars, though, stretching back to the 1950s AG6 Frau Spyder.  

Such heritage continues with this, the GranCabrio, because whatever talents it may prove to have in other areas, we think you’ll agree that it is a stunning-looking motor car. At least, that was the universal opinion of those we asked. 

As the name suggests, the GranCabrio is based on the GranTurismo. The coupé is available with either a 4.2 or a 4.7-litre V8, and a choice of a conventional automatic or automated manual gearbox. However, there is just one GranCabrio engine/gearbox combo: a 4.7-litre automatic. However it can be had in standard or more focused Sport trims. Maserati has also introduced the MC variant to the Grancabrio range. It draws on the styling of the stripped-out MC Stradale GranTurismo, but with no mechanical changes.

Covering 4.9m of road space, the GranCabrio is a very long car. A Mercedes E-class convertible, itself capable of carrying four, is some 20cm shorter, and even a Bentley Continental GTC falls 8cm short of the Maserati. Although the GranCabrio doesn’t exactly disguise its proportions, it does present them in the best possible light. Which is in no small part down to the decision by Maserati to opt for a canvas roof over a folding metal design. The triple-layer roof, available in a choice of six colours, takes 28 seconds to close and can be operated on the move at speeds below 19mph.