From £13,420
Our first drive of the new Audi A3 in the UK has revealed it to be a good, capable companion if slightly lacking in ambition

Our Verdict

The Audi A3 is now in its third-generation and the premium hatchback ups the ante on quality once more

4 September 2012

What is it?: 

Not just an all new Audi A3, but an all new platform that will be rolled out across myriad of models from Volkswagen, Seat, Skoda and other Audi over time. For now though this is the A3’s first proper test on UK roads, an environment in which innumerable Audis have struggled to tackle in recent and not so recent times.

But despite looks that are evolutionary to the point of invisibility, this is a clean sheet design, so all prior expectations can be set aside. After all Audi has just replaced two other long servers, the A8 and A6 with machines not so much improved as transformed beyond the point of meaningful comparison.

A commensurate improvement should be all that needed to for class leadership, at least until the new Mercedes A-class goes on sale.

What's it like?: 

‘Good’ is the very word. Not great and certainly not ground-breaking, but clearly and indisputably good. A3 owners of old will find adapting to the new about as easy as replacing their toothbrush: it feels a little sharper but does exactly the same job but to a rather higher standard.

The 2-litre TDI will be the best-seller in the UK even after the 99 g/km 1.6-litre TDI goes on sale in November and with good reason: it offers 148bhp vs the 1.6 TDI’s measly 103bhp and 0-62mph acceleration of 8.6sec instead of 10.7sec. Yet the price at the pumps is minimal: the 2-litre’s 68.9mpg is a mere 5.4mpg inferior and while its CO2 emissions do tip over the 100g/km mark, few are going to grudge spending £20 on a tax disc after their first year.

It’s a smooth and quiet engine too, still discernibly diesel at medium to high loads, but hushed at a constant cruise and capable of pulling the unfeasibly high gearing of the slick six speed manual gearbox.

On the chassis side, Audi has played it very safe. While Mercedes has opted for a deliberately sporting set up for its new A-class and waits anxiously to see whether the resulting ride quality is up to the unique challenge posed by our roads, Audi has gone the other way, ensuring above all that the A3 rides at least respectably on this side of the channel. The test car was in Sport specification which comes with stiffened springs as standard but with normal settings as a no cost option. I’d take it because the Sport was much improved over the old A3 but still just a little restless on Home County A and B roads without offering anything particularly dynamic in the corners to justify it. The car handles capably, insofar as it will continue to go where you point it under provocation that would have its predecessor helplessly scrabbling for grip. But this is still no driver’s car: there’s too little interaction between man and machine for that.

So it’s best not to continue trying to bend it to your will but instead give yourself a break, sit back and enjoy the scenery. In the A3’s case it’s another classically conservative Audi interior. It’s functional, logical and, if you apply the time-honoured push and prod test, you’ll find real quality here too. And if you’re worried about the apparent lack of rear room you’ll probably be more likely to want a five door which, when it appears in Sportback form next year, will have miraculously sprouted a longer wheelbase.

And yet there is something missing here: a dash of originality perhaps, or just a little something unexpected. Like the outside, the interior is terribly predictable and lacking the sense of occasion now seen on both the impressive new Volvo V40 and forthcoming Mercedes-Benz A-class.

Should I buy one?: 

The A3 is the cash ISA of the premium compact class: an undeniably sound product with no nasty surprises up its sleeve, guaranteed to carry on giving for as long as it’s yours. And it will undoubtedly be a better car with which to live than drive. Unlike too many previous Audis it doesn’t throw its arms up in horror at the first sight of a UK road, it just calmly knuckles down to the task and is pretty capable as a result.

But you need to know it is also as unadventurous to drive as it is to look at. To all those who made the old A3 such a mammoth sales success these last nine years, that’s the news they’ve been waiting to hear. Others, myself among them, would have been happier still were it a touch more ambitious. This is a safe car, not a bold one.

Audi A3 2.0 TDI Sport

Price £22,370; 0-62mph 8.6sec; Top Speed 134mph; Economy 68.9mpg; CO2 106g/km; Kerb weight 1280kg; Engine 1968cc, 4cyl, turbodiesel; Power 148bhp at 3500rpm; Torque lb ft 236lb ft at 1750rpm; Gearbox 6-sp manual

Join the debate

Comments
29

4 September 2012

Nice design cues,but on the whole it's still a bit ho hum in the looks department.

Peter Cavellini.

4 September 2012

I've got a pound says it isn't.

It'll be blunt as heck in 6th gear and a you'll be continually changing gear in day-to-day driving, where you wouldn't be if they just gave it 33-34mph / 1000rpm.

4 September 2012

Challenger440 wrote:

I've got a pound says it isn't.

It'll be blunt as heck in 6th gear and a you'll be continually changing gear in day-to-day driving, where you wouldn't be if they just gave it 33-34mph / 1000rpm.

I think you might be surpised. My old 2.0tdi A3 was only at about 1700rpm at 70mph in 6th and it could pull quite happily from 40mph. This 'new' engine produces max torque at 1750rpm which will help.

I quite like this new A3, but then I liked my old Sportback so there's no surpise. It's a 'nice' car which is easy to live with rather than exciting in any way and that's enough for 95% of people. If the ride on my A3 hadn't been so jiggly I'd probably still have it.

I do wonder why Audi is releasing the 3 door first when the 5 door outsells it 5 to1. I changed my car for a BMW in March but if the 5 door A3 was coming out now rather than sometime nexy year I might have waited.

4 September 2012

Lee23404 wrote:

I think you might be surpised.

Well, we'll see...  my Seat Ibiza 2.0TDI (140hp) pulls ~38mph / 1000rpm, and it's too long for the engine in normal driving - you really need to be doing over 50mph  before you can use 6th - which is a pain in the usual slow down / speed up antics of rush hour traffic  It returns 63mpg.

My old Fabia VRs with old tech 1.9TDi (130hp) pulled ~33mph/1000rpm in top and would pull you up a hill at 30mph in 6th sitting on the 800rpm idle - hugely flexible (felt like it had a big V6 in it) and enjoyable to drive.  It returned 63mpg...  progress?

 

5 September 2012

Lee23404 wrote:

I do wonder why Audi is releasing the 3 door first when the 5 door outsells it 5 to1. I changed my car for a BMW in March but if the 5 door A3 was coming out now rather than sometime nexy year I might have waited.

If the 5 door came out straight away, they'd probably never sell any 3 door ones. Give the 3 door chance to sell a bit...?

You've got to tie yourself to the Mast my Friend, then the Storm will end.

4 September 2012

Volkswagen is the new British Leyland. All the same underneath but different prices and badges. The lemmings must love that!

4 September 2012

BenC30 wrote:

Volkswagen is the new British Leyland. All the same underneath but different prices and badges. The lemmings must love that!

+1

4 September 2012

BenC30 wrote:

Volkswagen is the new British Leyland. All the same underneath but different prices and badges. The lemmings must love that!

Just without the terrible engineering, unreliablilty, union strikes, government intervention and disatrous financial dealings.

If VW was British we'd be singing their praises as a huge success story and probably wouldn't be in so much financial trouble as a country as we'd have something decent to export that the rest of the world actually wanted to buy.

4 September 2012

Orangewheels wrote:

BenC30 wrote:

Volkswagen is the new British Leyland. All the same underneath but different prices and badges. The lemmings must love that!

Just without the terrible engineering, unreliablilty, union strikes, government intervention and disatrous financial dealings.

If VW was British we'd be singing their praises as a huge success story and probably wouldn't be in so much financial trouble as a country as we'd have something decent to export that the rest of the world actually wanted to buy.

Well said.

4 September 2012

Orangewheels wrote:

If VW was British we'd be singing their praises as a huge success story and probably wouldn't be in so much financial trouble as a country as we'd have something decent to export that the rest of the world actually wanted to buy.

Actually no, we'd probably just be accusing Autocar of being biased towards British brands, and have decided that they are all rubbish compared to  ____  [insert German manufacturer here]

rant over.

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