The increasingly common technology designed to save fuel might reduce consumption, but what effect does it have on engine life?
22 September 2014

Stop-start, the system that acts with blink-of-an-eye speed to save fuel in traffic queues, has not just come of age, it’s something car buyers now expect.

In urban situations especially, stop-start should be making a real-world difference, but will the durability of engines be affected in the long term?

A conventional electric starter motor works by engaging a small pinion gear with a large ‘ring’ gear fitted around the outside of the engine flywheel.

The latest stop-start technology looks much the same but the motors are more powerful, faster acting and more robust. Some are designated ‘TS’ for ‘tandem solenoid’ and designed to cope more smoothly with scenarios where the engine is about to stop and then the driver accelerates again.

Such a moment may come when the driver has decided to stop, but for whatever reason has a change of mind, such as when the traffic moves off unexpectedly.

At that moment the engine might be ‘committed’ to stopping but is still spinning, so to avoid crunching, one solenoid fires up the starter motor to synchronise its speed with the engine before the second smoothly engages the gear.

Can engines survive stop-start?

So when it comes to durability and long life, all the bases relating to the starter gear itself should be covered, but the higher number of stop-start cycles lead to increased engine wear unless steps are taken to prevent it.

“A normal car without automatic stop-start can be expected to go through up to 50,000 stop-start events during its lifetime,” says Gerhard Arnold, who is responsible for bearing design at Federal Mogul.

“But with automatic stop-start being activated every time the car comes to a standstill, the figure rises dramatically, perhaps to as many as 500,000 stop start cycles over the engine’s life.”

That’s a big jump and one that poses major challenges to the durability and life of the engine’s bearings.

A fundamental component of the engine and also one of the heaviest is the crankshaft. It’s supported as it spins by a number of precision ground journals along its length running in ‘plain’ main bearings (no ball bearings or rollers, just smooth metal). These are the main bearings and the effect is greater on the bearing at the back of the engine immediately adjacent to the starter motor.

When the engine is running, the crankshaft and main bearing surfaces don’t actually touch, but are separated by a super-thin film of oil, fed under pressure and pumped around the bearing surfaces by the action of the spinning crankshaft. This process is called ‘hydrodynamic lubrication’ but when the engine stops, the crank settles onto the bearing, the two metal surfaces coming into contact.

How rust helps to prevent wear

When the engine starts, there’s a point before the two surfaces become separated by the oil film called the ‘boundary condition’, where the crankshaft is spinning, but there’s metal-to-metal contact between the bearing surfaces.

This is when most wear takes place. Fitting stop-start means the boundary condition (and metal-to-metal contact) could exist perhaps 500,000 times in the life of the engine instead of 50,000 and normal bearings would wear out long before that.

Two things prevent that happening. The first is that bearing manufacturers are developing new bearing material with greater self-lubricating properties to resist wear on start-up.

Federal Mogul has developed a new material called Irox with a polymer coating containing particles of iron oxide (rust), which in this microscopic form is surprisingly slippery.

In fact it’s so slippery that the co-efficient of friction of an Irox bearing is 50 per cent lower than a conventional aluminium bearing and will easily last the life of an engine equipped with stop-start.

Low friction oils can also assist

The second is improvements in lubricating oils. A modern engine oil contains an additive package comprising a complex chemical cocktail. The technical director of UK company, Millers Oils, Martyn Mann, says the formulation of these packages are critical: “We’ve reduced friction with our oils and improved durability of the oil film and we think that has to be the way forward with stop-start systems.”

Millers began researching low-friction oils in its laboratories back in 2006. “We put a formulation together, tested it on a friction rig and found we could reduce the sliding friction between typical components like pistons and liners by 50 percent,” says Mann.

Generally, this reduces heat, power loss, fuel consumption and wear but Miller’s new triple ester nano-technology, known as Nanodrive, goes further. Tiny nano-particles like microscopic ball bearings exfoliate under high pressure, the polymer ‘flakes’ adhering to the engine surfaces.

So far the technology is available only in Miller’s high-end racing oils, but in relation to stop-start, it could also reduce wear during each re-start when the most wear takes place.

With low-friction bearing and lubrication technology in place the potential threat to engine life by stop-start systems should theoretically be overcome. But the current technology is still relatively new and only time will tell whether every car manufacturer has got it right.

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Comments
28

22 September 2014

Our new MINI Cooper has stop-start as standard. I guess it's fitted to improve official urban mpg and CO2 figures but, as we live in a rural area and hardly ever drive in significant traffic, it's more of an irritation than a help, whatever the additional wear and tear implications. I always disable it as soon as I start the car. Unfortunately, it's default setting is on and I don't know how to change this.

22 September 2014

So basically, there's some good stuff coming but today's stop-starts will knacker prematurely, landing us with huge bills etc. Wonderful, just wonderful. Eco-nutters, I hope you're happy now.

22 September 2014
Norma Smellons wrote:

So basically, there's some good stuff coming but today's stop-starts will knacker prematurely, landing us with huge bills etc. Wonderful, just wonderful. Eco-nutters, I hope you're happy now.

There is absolutely nothing wrong with attempting to reduce fuel consumption. The principle problem is that, as with the DSG transmission, the customer will be doing the field trials but with more excuse.

22 September 2014
Norma Smellons wrote:

So basically, there's some good stuff coming but today's stop-starts will knacker prematurely, landing us with huge bills etc. Wonderful, just wonderful. Eco-nutters, I hope you're happy now.

Nothing in the article said that - manufacturers take steps to beef things up so they can handle the extra stop/start cycles, thre are no reports of engines failing due to wear caused by stop/start systems. And why would anyone want to waste fuel by running the engine when the car is going nowhere ? Its common sense not "eco nutter"ism. Calm down, get back in your box and stop spouting alarmist drivel by trying to read smething into the article that simple isnt there.

22 September 2014

Hi there,
First, I want to appologise my english (I am not a nattive).
I think the start-stop systems have a great negative influence on turbo engines, no matter if is diesel or gasoline. Technically speaking, if the engine was in heavy usage, you don't have to stop 'it for about 10 to 20 seconds. In this time, the turbocharger it suppose to slow down from 150000-250000 rotations, depending on the engine model, performance and usage. As far as I know, start-stop systems have many parameters which decide if the system is on or off (like the engine temperature, outside temp, A/C system, battery voltage, etc), but none of them monitor the turbocharger. In time, I think this will be a big problem, maybe not for the first owner, but for sure for the second one, very expensive to fix or replace and also, with environmental damages.

22 September 2014

I agree with the mini owner's comments, my M135i auto also defaults to stop/start which is crazy on the hot version of the car. Unless sitting in stationary traffic I do not use stop start & would like to change the default setting to off - can any tech wizards out there help or point me in the direction of someone who can ???

Curly

22 September 2014

It can only be done via coding using esys software and psdzdata.

Auto-Start-Stop set to ‘Off’ at every startup:
ECU: FEM_BODY 3023 TCM_MSA_DEFAULT_OFF
New Value: aktiv
Default Value: nicht_aktiv

Auto-Start-Stop remembers if set to ‘On’ or ‘Off’ from previous shutdown
ECU: FEM_BODY 3023 TCM_MSA_MEMORY
New Value: aktiv
Default Value: nicht_aktiv

22 September 2014

Wow thanks Kitster did not expect an answer so soon - beyond my abilities to complete I'm more of a mechanical kind of guy, do you know anyone / where in NE England who can do this or is it a main dealer only job. Previously I was told by the main dealer that it could not be changed, but that was the sales department talking.

Curly

22 September 2014

.

22 September 2014
Curly55 wrote:

Wow thanks Kitster did not expect an answer so soon - beyond my abilities to complete I'm more of a mechanical kind of guy, do you know anyone / where in NE England who can do this or is it a main dealer only job. Previously I was told by the main dealer that it could not be changed, but that was the sales department talking.

You can pretty much forget about anything the sales/techies say in the showroom. Basically they will only follow the BMW standards/rules. Can't post a link but search for 'BMW F30 3 Series Coding DIY - Code Auto Start Stop, DVD, Folding Mirrors, Etc.' It's for the F3X (3 Series), but its the same software for pretty much all FXX series cars. There is a guide on how to code your car, its not as scary as you think. Most of it involves changing flags from on/off. I've just installed the ProNav in my car, I did it all in 30 mins flat include removing the trim, install and coding. Of course you do this at your own risk. This has to be done by yourself, no dealer will touch this.

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