Insider has revealed that McLaren will continue to develop the P13 on its own, despite a recent deal with Honda for F1 engines

McLaren’s deal with Honda to supply its Formula 1 team with engines from 2015 onwards is not expected to have any impact on its road car division, an insider has told Autocar.

Drawing a parallel between McLaren’s current F1 deal with Mercedes, and the fact that arrangement bears no relation to the road car division, the source said: “At the moment there is no anticipated impact on the road car division as a result of the Honda deal.”

In particular, the source denied that Honda would have any involvement with the McLaren P13, the firm’s next all-new road car and a mooted Porsche 911 Turbo rival.

Development of that car, which is thought to use a 450bhp version of McLaren's 3.8-litre V8, is said to be at an “advanced” stage.

Join the debate

Comments
10

22 May 2013

It's no secret that Honda are developing a new NSX so they surely wouldn't benefit from being involved in another supercar. Furthermore, McLaren's current engine provider, Mercedes-Benz, aren't involved with McLaren Automotive whatsover (publically, at least), and haven't been since the SLR. So what's to gain from a press release like this? I'm struggling to see.

Myk

22 May 2013

MikeSpencer wrote:

It's no secret that Honda are developing a new NSX so they surely wouldn't benefit from being involved in another supercar. Furthermore, McLaren's current engine provider, Mercedes-Benz, aren't involved with McLaren Automotive whatsover (publically, at least), and haven't been since the SLR. So what's to gain from a press release like this? I'm struggling to see.

There had been speculation elsewhere on the internet about Honda supplying engines for the "base" McLaren -  the usual people adding 2+2 and getting 5 - which Autocar hadn't bought into (or hadn't spotted), so I do understand this denial.

22 May 2013

Myk wrote:

MikeSpencer wrote:

It's no secret that Honda are developing a new NSX so they surely wouldn't benefit from being involved in another supercar. Furthermore, McLaren's current engine provider, Mercedes-Benz, aren't involved with McLaren Automotive whatsover (publically, at least), and haven't been since the SLR. So what's to gain from a press release like this? I'm struggling to see.

There had been speculation elsewhere on the internet about Honda supplying engines for the "base" McLaren -  the usual people adding 2+2 and getting 5 - which Autocar hadn't bought into (or hadn't spotted), so I do understand this denial.

Thank you for clearing that up Myk. Sorry to all concerned, I hadn't read that speculation but still felt it necessary to wade in and put the boot in. My big mouth and all...

22 May 2013

The last British sports car maker to manufacture its own engines - was bankrupted.

I can see logic in using the engines of a world class engineering company.

Funnily enough so did Ron Dennis and Gordon Murray, when they produced the iconic McLaren F1.

Also, my opinion is that Honda will sell a load more NSXs if the company produced road car engines for McLaren.   Just my opinion

Malo Mori Quam Foedari

22 May 2013

I think it was in McLaren's interest to collaborate with Honda for the engines and that by denying such a cooperation they made a silly mistake...

It is inconsistent and brand damaging that McLaren claims to build its own engines for road cars but sources them elsewhere for F1. Can you imagine Ferrari (or Porsche) using Ferrari branded engines (developed by, say, Magna) on its road cars, but BMW engines on its racing cars?

V

22 May 2013

I think the F1 engine is as much about McLaren having someone putting in £ 20 million a year to the team, and a lot of technical input too.

 

For their road car I think the engine is acutally made by someone else, specifically for McLaren.   This is where lines get blurred as to who makes what.   I believe it's a company who does race engines that have co-developed the McLaren engine and it's absolutely unique to McLaren. Just that McLaren don't acutally cast the metal etc. but receive a completed engine.   And before anybody says anything, there is nothing wrong with that at all!

 

TBC

23 May 2013

The downside of connecting road and race car engine suppliers, is that if the supplier for the race team changes, do you continue with two suppliers, or face huge re-engineering costs to allow the use of  a different engine in the road cars.

McLaren's choice in using their own engine makes perfect sense when looking at the projected production figures.

23 May 2013

Firstly, I don't think that this is a press release from McLaren - the article quotes "an insider" - and that insider may or may not be in the know, and may or may not be telling the truth even if he/she is in the know.

Secondly, when Mercedes returned to F1, they did so using Ilmor engines. Once they were satisfied with the performance, they bought the company and renamed it Mercedes-Ilmor, and it's now named Mercedes AMG High Performance Engines. Ther point that I'm making is that if the "Mercedes" engine in a McLaren is a Mercedes because Mercedes bought the manufacturer, then surely the engine in a McLaren could just as reasonably be labelled a McLaren engine because McLaren bought the engine from Mercedes (or Honda).

23 May 2013

There's nothing wrong in McLaren outsourcing their engines, labelling them McLaren and having a different supplier for their road and F1 cars.

However, automotive royalty sorts of define itself through fully integrated production. True, McLaren and Pagani managed to create icons without building their engines, but I repeat my question: what would you say if the next autocar news would be the announcement that Ferrari's (or Porsche's) new road engines will be built by Magna and that they signed an agreement with Renault for F1 engine supply?

Would you really say "oh, that's really cool"?

V

10 June 2013

a fine looking machine just hope they can mae it affordable.

steroids on Facebook. steroids on Twitter.

Add your comment

Log in or register to post comments

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week