Next version of the CR-V looks set to grow and could offer seven seats as standard when it goes on sale in 2017
12 July 2016

The next-generation Honda CR-V has been spotted testing with a current-generation car ahead of its launch in 2017.

The new mid-sized SUV will be a larger and more premium product than the outgoing CR-V, giving more space in Honda's range for the HR-V crossover, which slots in just below it.

As shown by these new pictures, the upcoming model CR-V also features a completely new design for its tail-lights. The current car's vertical units look set to be replaced by more angular horizontal ones. The changes at the front appear more evolutionary. 

Honda’s head of cars in the UK, Leon Brannan, has previously hinted to Autocar that the new CR-V will offer seven seats as standard and four-wheel drive, in a bid to rival more premium products such as the Land Rover Discovery Sport and Volvo XC60.

“CR-V is a massive pillar for us,” he said. “I’m not sure that HR-V in the UK will ever become a four-wheel-drive car; most people in this segment will vote with their feet and buy two-wheel drive. So if we can assume that HR-V will only ever be two-wheel drive, then you’ve got to come up with a different proposition [with the CR-V].

“Can we compete with Land Rover as a brand? That’s less about CR-V and more about Honda as a brand." 

The interior of the new CR-V is expected to borrow heavily from the HR-V, including that car’s touchscreen infotainment system and dashboard layout.

Engines could mirror those found in the HR-V, including 118bhp 1.6-litre diesel and 128bhp 1.5-litre petrol units.

The next CR-V is expected to be built in Canada.

Sam Sheehan and Darren Moss

Our Verdict

Honda CR-V
If the new CR-V looks more crossover than old-guard SUV it may be because the roofline is 30mm lower than before

Can the Honda CR-V bring anything new to a crowded arena?

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Comments
18

7 July 2015

For goodness sake, the CR-V needs something more than 150 PS from it's diesel to compete now as the competition has had 180-200 PS for years - going bigger with the next model will just make that even more imperative.

7 July 2015
Ruperts Trooper wrote:

For goodness sake, the CR-V needs something more than 150 PS from it's diesel to compete now as the competition has had 180-200 PS for years - going bigger with the next model will just make that even more imperative.

Its a 160ps 1.6 these days and CRV never felt desperately short of pace compared to others due to conservative power ratings and keeping an eye on the weight. But yes it should have more as even the new Hyundai will be available with a 182ps.

See plenty of new X-Trails around, its huge, 7 seat, 4WD yet has to make do with only 128 bhp!

And don't forget that not getting carried away with the power keeps the CO2 down even with 4wd and keeps the car from sliding off company car lists.

7 July 2015

Why on earth, when the CR-V is likely to grow, would you put a 1.5 non-turbo petrol in there?? Its distinct lack of torque is noted even in the HR-V, this cannot be accurate.


A34

7 July 2015
bomb wrote:

Why on earth, when the CR-V is likely to grow, would you put a 1.5 non-turbo petrol in there?? Its distinct lack of torque is noted even in the HR-V, this cannot be accurate.

Either that or Honda hasn't realised that Premium = Power (and Size!)...

7 July 2015

I have a CR-V, it is absolutely fine at what it does and what I expect from it, I certainly do not need 7 seats, nor for the next one to be any bigger or have any more poke or be any more expensive... but i would appreciate trim colour choice outside of the funeral black... and maybe more than just blue red grey and black hues of paint... learn something from BMW, Mercedes and Lexus here...

If I wanted something more I might have bought a Merc or LR or BMW, but I didn't... Honda is in danger of driving itself so far up market it will lose the client base it has gathered over 20 years altogether, see Land Rover, (now a complete muddle of expensive overpriced cars that have left many of us behind) and also where the volume and profitability sits seems to be in politically volatile China, Russia and other emerging nations. I am waiting for the bubble to burst, it has started withthe fall of the Chinese stock market some 30% in the last month or so... LR beware!

Honda please have a rethink, the CR-V is fine as it is now you have the small Deisel and 9 speed auto box... if you must go bigger make a new model extended wheel base model... but leave the current CR-V to go on succeeding where it is...

8 July 2015
the instigator wrote:

leave the current CR-V to go on succeeding where it is...

Why don't Honda just stick to what they are good at. My Dad loves his CR-V, he had a mk1 and now drives a mk2, no doubt he will trade it in for a mk3 next time... it is the perfect size for him, with room for occasional family trips plus luggage but still able to fit into supermarket parking spaces. He likes a petrol automatic and his CR-V is not too big so it still has acceptable running costs. He would not enjoy driving a small diesel engine and thinks they are a false economy as there is more to go wrong on them than with a standard petrol engine. (I happen to agree with him).

If Honda want to sell a bigger 7 seat 4x4 then fine, and if they want to push the HR-V then fine, but it won't appeal to my Dad. He just wants a medium sized petrol auto 4x4 that gives around 30mpg, he doesn't want a cramped 2wd crossover and he doesn't want something massive with a stupid little diesel engine. I suspect there are a lot of satisfied CR-V drivers that would say the same.

currently a happy owner of a Mitsubishi Shogun Pinin :)

8 July 2015

Will need more power!

8 July 2015

The 1.5 struggles in the HR-V god knows how bad it would be in the bigger car. Does this mean the current 1.8 is so bad and outdated it'll be dropped soon!

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

8 July 2015

And so too, the new Jazz I believe. Which leaves the UK Swindon factory just building Civics no one seems to want. One has to wonder if there is a future for a stand alone car plant with a capacity of 250,000 units just building around 100,000 cars per year. It's about time that Honda got its act together and started building cars that we Europeans actually want to buy.

12 July 2016
LP in Brighton wrote:

And so too, the new Jazz I believe. Which leaves the UK Swindon factory just building Civics no one seems to want. One has to wonder if there is a future for a stand alone car plant with a capacity of 250,000 units just building around 100,000 cars per year. It's about time that Honda got its act together and started building cars that we Europeans actually want to buy.

Honda is changing from a build-local sell-local model to a global reach. Pre-recession we lost the S2000, Integra and other more specialist models in part because of a change to that policy (emissions not withstanding).
With the continuing failure of the overall European market to fully recover, Honda will be sending 5dr Civics outside of Europe (and Australia).
This balances the load of future recessions across the globe (vs Localised) but puts more pressure to ensure each individual model sells throughout its lifespan. It's a tough call as to which is approach best but success of 5dr Civics in other markets may help protect Swindon against Brexit fallout.

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