Lamborghini's all-new sports car caught testing ahead of Geneva motor show launch in 2014; tipped to be called Cabrera
17 June 2013

The replacement for the Lamborghini Gallardo, likely to be called the Cabrera, has been spotted testing in this latest set of spy photographs. The Cabrera will enter production in 2014 following a reveal at the Geneva Motor Show. 

Lamborghini is keen to get a replacement for the Gallardo up and running, having very recently ended production of the model. The brand has also launched a new Microsite, code-named Hexagon Project, which allows visitors to hear the sound of the new car's engine.

A production version of the Cabrera is set to go on sale in the UK during the second half of next year, and follows the example of its predecessor in sharing key components, including a lightweight carbonfibre and aluminium spaceframe structure, with the replacement for today’s Audi R8, due in 2015. 

The new car, which carries the internal codename LP724, is said to have grown marginally in length to almost 4500mm, or 16mm longer than its predecessor, with width and height remaining close to the 1900mm and 1165mm respectively of the Gallardo. This is backed up the test mule, which appears longer than the current Gallardo. 

Together with an edgy new exterior inspired by the dramatic Sesto Elemento concept, the Gallardo replacement is set to adopt a new interior layout that, with a slight increase in wheelbase over its predecessor at 2600mm, will offer added levels of accommodation.

Despite harbouring initial plans to base its new car around a contemporary carbonfibre monocoque similar to that of the Aventador, Lamborghini has been forced to follow a more conservative route dictated by parent company Audi and its second-generation R8 supercar.

Both cars have been conceived around a modular spacefame. This will allow them to share vital components, including selected parts of a new, lightweight carbonfibre and aluminium structure that, Autocar can confirm, weighs 198kg in the form to be used by the Audi. That is 24kg less than the all-aluminium structure used by the current R8.

Despite using a similar structure, the R8 and the Gallardo replacement will receive different wheelbases. The Audi’s is 30mm longer than the Lamborghini’s for greater levels of interior accommodation, including stowage space behind the seats. By using a shorter wheelbase than the Audi, the structure of the new Lamborghini is a further 3kg lighter, at just 195kg.

The new spaceframe structure will be clothed in a body that uses a combination of carbonfibre-reinforced plastic and aluminium panels. The move is aimed at bringing the new mid-engined Lamborghini to the scales at less than 1500kg — the official kerb weight of today’s four-wheel-drive Gallardo.

Power will come from an updated version of the Gallardo’s naturally aspirated 5.2-litre V10 petrol engine. It will be tuned to deliver close to 600bhp and 400lb ft of torque in standard guise, while complying with stringent new EU6 emissions regulations set to come into force next year.

The reworked engine will be mated to a standard six-speed manual gearbox, while the new seven-speed dual-clutch automatic from the R8 will be optional, replacing the current Gallardo’s six-speed automated manual ’box. 

Alongside standard four-wheel-drive models, Lamborghini also plans selected rear-wheel-drive versions of its new supercar.

Meanwhile, rumours suggest that the Gallardo replacement will take the name Cabrera. In keeping with Lamborghini tradition, it refers to a line of Spanish bulls whose lineage can be traced to other famous breeds, including the Miura, Gallardo, Navarra, Veragua and Vistahermosa-Parladé.

Our Verdict

The Lamborghini Gallardo is the full supercar sensation with sublime handling

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Comments
25

17 June 2013

If it's as good as the Sesto Elemento,which i've seen a video of being tested,then, this car will be a stunner, by the way the Sesto engine at full chat sounds like an 80's F1 car,go on!, hunt the vid down on Youtube>

Peter Cavellini.

17 June 2013

If true, that is a massive advantage for Lamborghini over the competition.  Excellent.

17 June 2013

If this article is to be believed, well done Lambo! Nice to see a gimmick free (looking at you Porsche) 6 speed manual box will be available.

Too bad about 5% of customers will take it :/

17 June 2013

Lamborghini is only for rich people

17 June 2013

rvtrailers wrote:

Lamborghini is only for rich people

I know loads of oiks with Gallardos

TBC

17 June 2013

Ferrari and Aston Martin are for poor people?

17 June 2013

Good job they didn't call it the Lamborghini Vistahermosa-Parlade, doesn't exactly trip off the tongue does it!

17 June 2013

OK, so in ye olde days, we could go to the forums and tell Autocar what we did/didn't like about the website, about the standard of journalism, etc, etc, and they'd usually . . . ignore us. At least we had a voice, even if nobody listened.

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Why the heck would I like to read stories that are at least 3 years out of date, and were factually inaccurate when they were written ?

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Whilst I appreciate that websites need to engage the visitor, presenting them with a variety of detritus is not the way to do it.

I may not subscribe to the magazine anymore but I do visit the website several times a day, and I'll stop if Autocar persists in presenting ancient excrement as items of interest.

One visitor not returning is no big deal, but I'm sure that I'm not alone - I go, others will go, leading to a reduction in advertising revenue for Autocar.

Right now, this page is displaying an advert about a woman who (apparently) earns £437 every day, working from home - aside from the fact that I'm wondering how she earns £437 every day (never £436 or £438?) , I'm wondering why I'm seeing an advert for women working from home on a car website. Well I would wonder but I already know the answer - the advertisers are already moving away from Autocar . . . and who can blame them ?

Think about it guys.

17 June 2013

SpiritOfSenna wrote:

OK, so in ye olde days, we could go to the forums and tell Autocar what we did/didn't like about the website, about the standard of journalism, etc, etc, and they'd usually . . . ignore us. At least we had a voice, even if nobody listened.

Now, it seems that we don't even have a forum. If I'm wrong, please tell me so, and post a link. If it still exists, it's so well camouflaged that I couldn't find it, and I really looked around before posting this comment.

So where do I tell the world that I think the "You May Like" section of the website is absolute cr*p, total sheet, and utter boll*cks ?

Why the heck would I like to read stories that are at least 3 years out of date, and were factually inaccurate when they were written ?

For example, Audi R4 anyone ? . . . Its's been "confirmed" apparently . . . oh no, it hasn't, it's been canned, together with the VW Bluesport, and Baby Porsche. All of which have shown up in "You May Like" stories over the past week.

Whilst I appreciate that websites need to engage the visitor, presenting them with a variety of detritus is not the way to do it.

I may not subscribe to the magazine anymore but I do visit the website several times a day, and I'll stop if Autocar persists in presenting ancient excrement as items of interest.

One visitor not returning is no big deal, but I'm sure that I'm not alone - I go, others will go, leading to a reduction in advertising revenue for Autocar.

Right now, this page is displaying an advert about a woman who (apparently) earns £437 every day, working from home - aside from the fact that I'm wondering how she earns £437 every day (never £436 or £438?) , I'm wondering why I'm seeing an advert for women working from home on a car website. Well I would wonder but I already know the answer - the advertisers are already moving away from Autocar . . . and who can blame them ?

Think about it guys.

Well said.

 

Autocar, please get rid of this extra rubbish that has infected the site over the past few days

6 September 2013

SpiritOfSenna@

This article,which it really is lika a piece for a job application,unfortunately you have been unsuccessful this time,because, this is a ranty piece,if you took all the ranty bits out, you'd have a paragraph of to the point info.

Peter Cavellini.

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