Skoda Fabia Estate Greenline II is greenest car ever made by Czech firm
24 June 2010

The 83.1mpg Skoda Fabia Estate Greenline II will cost from £13,740.

Powered by a 75bhp 1.2-litre three-cylinder turbodiesel engine, the Greenline averages 83.1mpg and emits of 89g/km.

The car has an engine stop-start system, plus brake-energy recuperation, a gearshift indicator, low-rolling-resistance tyres and a lowered chassis for improved aerodynamics.

Standard equipment includes alloy wheels, air-conditioning, an eight-speaker stereo with MP3 input, remote central locking, an alarm system and stability control.

A hatchback version of the Greenline II goes on sale in in October 2010.

Kit Myers

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Comments
13

24 June 2010

At £3,315 more than the 1.2 petrol estate, there is no way it can be a purchase based on economy, making the 83.1mpg irrelevant.

24 June 2010

It's an odd one. The MPG is impressive, but the engine/power is really low, especially for an estate car. God knows how sluggish it would be when fully loaded.

24 June 2010

I can't see the attraction myself. I get around 63mpg from my Fabia VRS on a run.

24 June 2010

Once again Beachland making baseless assumptions. You save £120 at the moment in tax every year for the diesel compared to the petrol - I'll work with £120, but we all know that within 5 years the petrol could see tax rises as it's 121-124g, whereas being below 90g the diesel should escape most taxes rises. So, 5 years ownership, £600 saved in tax. Someone purchases this because they do a higher than average mileage, though not much higher than average, say 15,000 miles a year. That's a £600 a year saving over the petrol. Over 5 years that's £3000. Total saving is £3600. Yet that's not the whole story - beachland didn't compare spec for spec the prices. The Greenline spec is higher than the "SE". So bring the 1.2SE up to Greenline spec and you're adding another ~£650. So the price difference is only £2700. In 5 years you'll saved £900 on running costs. Yet, obviously, this is not the whole story as I've not taken in to account depreciation. Residuals over 5 years are more difficult than over 3 (the car loses more value in the first 3 than the next 2). Looking at current market data cars on Fabias 5 years old - as well as the performance of "green used cars" we know that the diesel will have better residuals, but a higher purchase price. The diesel will lose £900 more in depreciation that the petrol. So over 5 years you break even, exactly, on 15,000 miles a year. Drive more miles, or keep it longer and you'll save money (especially as diesel residuals beyond 5 years and 90,000 miles are much stronger than petrol).

24 June 2010

[quote theonlydt]Once again Beachland making baseless assumptions. You save £120 at the moment in tax every year for the diesel compared to the petrol - I'll work with £120, but we all know that within 5 years the petrol could see tax rises as it's 121-124g, whereas being below 90g the diesel should escape most taxes rises. So, 5 years ownership, £600 saved in tax. Someone purchases this because they do a higher than average mileage, though not much higher than average, say 15,000 miles a year. That's a £600 a year saving over the petrol. Over 5 years that's £3000. Total saving is £3600. Yet that's not the whole story - beachland didn't compare spec for spec the prices. The Greenline spec is higher than the "SE". So bring the 1.2SE up to Greenline spec and you're adding another ~£650. So the price difference is only £2700. In 5 years you'll saved £900 on running costs. Yet, obviously, this is not the whole story as I've not taken in to account depreciation. Residuals over 5 years are more difficult than over 3 (the car loses more value in the first 3 than the next 2). Looking at current market data cars on Fabias 5 years old - as well as the performance of "green used cars" we know that the diesel will have better residuals, but a higher purchase price. The diesel will lose £900 more in depreciation that the petrol. So over 5 years you break even, exactly, on 15,000 miles a year. Drive more miles, or keep it longer and you'll save money (especially as diesel residuals beyond 5 years and 90,000 miles are much stronger than petrol).[/quote]

You can add showroom discounts your list too. Though I don't know if that will work in the diesel's favour or not.

Would be interested to see a test drive of this as I don't think we have seen the 1.2 TDI anywhere else yet. Prefer it in normal hatch form though.

24 June 2010

[quote Will86]You can add showroom discounts your list too. Though I don't know if that will work in the diesel's favour or not.[/quote] True. Skoda currently offering 17.5% off all their fabia's, including the Greenline. That brings the price of the Greenline down another £475 compared to the petrol.

24 June 2010

....[quote Will86]

[quote theonlydt]Once again Beachland making baseless assumptions. You save £120 at the moment in tax every year for the diesel compared to the petrol - I'll work with £120, but we all know that within 5 years the petrol could see tax rises as it's 121-124g, whereas being below 90g the diesel should escape most taxes rises. So, 5 years ownership, £600 saved in tax. Someone purchases this because they do a higher than average mileage, though not much higher than average, say 15,000 miles a year. That's a £600 a year saving over the petrol. Over 5 years that's £3000. Total saving is £3600. Yet that's not the whole story - beachland didn't compare spec for spec the prices. The Greenline spec is higher than the "SE". So bring the 1.2SE up to Greenline spec and you're adding another ~£650. So the price difference is only £2700. In 5 years you'll saved £900 on running costs. Yet, obviously, this is not the whole story as I've not taken in to account depreciation. Residuals over 5 years are more difficult than over 3 (the car loses more value in the first 3 than the next 2). Looking at current market data cars on Fabias 5 years old - as well as the performance of "green used cars" we know that the diesel will have better residuals, but a higher purchase price. The diesel will lose £900 more in depreciation that the petrol. So over 5 years you break even, exactly, on 15,000 miles a year. Drive more miles, or keep it longer and you'll save money (especially as diesel residuals beyond 5 years and 90,000 miles are much stronger than petrol).[/quote]

You can add showroom discounts your list too. Though I don't know if that will work in the diesel's favour or not.

Would be interested to see a test drive of this as I don't think we have seen the 1.2 TDI anywhere else yet. Prefer it in normal hatch form though.

[/quote] ive seen a test of this engine in the new polo bluemotion... needs to be revved a bit, torque useful in the mid range, characterful hum.... cant remember where i read it tho...on here??

24 June 2010

sacrilege, read the test of this engine on auto express.... http://www.autoexpress.co.uk/carreviews/firstdrives/253360/vw_polo_bluem...

24 June 2010

done well to get some projected figures, but they are only projections. the fact is you can save real cash of £3.3k straight away. who knows what will happen in the future, diesel could get banned (crosses fingers) or more likely the tax on emissions will disregard co2 and focus on NOx, instead. making diesels cost twice as much tax each year as petrols.

plus, you can put that £3.3k into investment, getting a conservative 5% return each year would give you about £160+ every year and you would still have the initial £3.3k as an asset.

its a no brainer, always save the cash on purchase.

24 June 2010

oh and i just checked the 1.2 is £90 a year not £120. remember to not use baseless figures ;)

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