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New cylinder deactivation system in Volkswagen Polo brings lower consumption and emissions without spoiling performance or the potential for fun

Our Verdict

Volkswagen Polo

The fifth-generation Volkswagen Polo has junior Golf looks, but is that enough?

2 February 2012

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19

2 February 2012

I think I'd take the GTI instead.

2 February 2012

It doesn't say so, but I presume this is the same engine tested in the A1 Sportback a couple of weeks ago?

2 February 2012

Not the headline story I know but why does a powerful, torquey engine in a small light car possibly need seven forward gears?

  • Let depreciation be your friend...

2 February 2012

[quote catnip]

It doesn't say so, but I presume this is the same engine tested in the A1 Sportback a couple of weeks ago?

[/quote]

I believe it is, yes.

2 February 2012

Perhaps I'm being a bit sceptical, but I have that niggling feeling that this bit of tech may be good for the carefully controlled EU cycle results but of little benefit to the motorist in the real world where things are far less exact.

The 7-speed DSG happens to be in the VW parts bin, which is no doubt why it will be used. Their 6-speed one is heavier and meant for torques over 184lb/ft so would be OTT for this application.

3 February 2012

[quote Adrian987]Perhaps I'm being a bit sceptical, but I have that niggling feeling that this bit of tech may be good for the carefully controlled EU cycle results but of little benefit to the motorist in the real world where things are far less exact.[/quote]

Sadly, I think you are right.

Question.

Forgetting the "environmental" element to the argument at the moment and looking at the real world where us, the average motorist, is more concerned about cost, there are a couple of things I want to know.

How much is this car likely to cost?

How much is it likely to save the motorist in fuel over, say, 12,000 miles?

How much is it going to cost to service and repair (no I'm not being a Luddite but this ain't a simple engine and gearbox combo!)?

Then consider how much would it cost us, including initial purchase cost, road fund etc, if this engine was say a little less efficient, a lot simpler, potentially a lot more reliable to run over the same 12,000 miles?

I'd wager the simpler car would be cheaper.

 

 

It's all about the twisties........

3 February 2012

My maths isn't great but please bear with and advise if I'm wrong Their claim (probably optimistic) is a saving of 0.4litres every 100km. Say £0.50 every 60 miles, £8.33 saved every 1,000 miles, £83.00 every 10,000 or say a year for this type of car meaning after 3 years of ownership you've saved £249.00.

You've got a more complicated car, with a lot less power at times, that cost more to produce that you've ultimately paid for.

Looks to me like you could actually be worse off

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

3 February 2012

^ what you say is entirely plausible but it is a prototype. Once a prototype improves and makes it to mass manufacturing where the price comes down and the savings increase it should then actually make sense.

3 February 2012

Complicated tech or not - I want one; the first petrol engine I've seen that might tempt me away from a torquey turbodiesel in ages. 138 bhp, 184 lb ft with 1.6 TDi like consumption but decent performance - fabulous. And I'll trust the German engineering excellence to make sure the deactivation system and the DSG work properly and cooperate to make it fun.

Yes please

3 February 2012

It is a pity that VW are adding this to a complex 1.4 turbo.

I would like to see it an ordinary 16 v 1.8 or 2.0 petrrol as an alterantive to a complex small displacement turbo

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