The Lada Niva is the first new Lada to enter the UK for 15 years and it offers rugged practicality for less than £11,000 (unless you buy extras such as the snow plough...)
  • First Drive

    Lada Niva

    The Lada Niva is the first new Lada to enter the UK for 15 years and it offers rugged practicality for less than £11,000 (unless you buy extras such as the snow

What is it?

It’s almost 15 years since a new Lada Niva entered the UK. But now you can buy a new one from a chap in Kent called Mark Key. Two models are available: a van version, which costs £8695 plus VAT and has its rear glass replaced with metal panels, and a car version that costs £10,974.

Left-hand drive is a bit of a bind, but unless Key can buy 500 cars a year from the factory the Russians aren’t willing to dust off the right-hand drive tooling.

However, the Niva has been given a selection of improvements, though to claim that it has been modernised would be overstating the case considerably. The 1.7-litre, four-cylinder petrol engine is now fitted with Bosch fuel injection and complies with Euro 5 emissions standards, the dashboard has been replaced with a new VDO instrument pack that looks only 15 years behind in design and the door mirrors are a bit bigger than they used to be.

The Niva was never the best of road cars, but off road, with its minimal 1210kg weight, narrow tyres, low-ratio transfer gearbox and diff lock, it was formidable across the mucky stuff. And when you had got both it and yourself covered in mud and goo, you could fling open the doors and hose out the interior. You can do the same today because the same plastic and rubber mats are used in the 2011 Niva. The trim plastics are ghastly, but the piglets or lambs in the back won’t mind and neither should you. Besides, the Niva is a cool-looking vehicle in a sort of Smeg fridge way.

The rest of the Niva is reassuringly as it was several decades ago. It even smells the same.

What’s it like?

Most modern cars are so quiet that all you can hear at speed is tyre noise. The Niva may also have noisy tyres, but you can’t tell because any road noise is drowned out by gearbox whine. The engine itself is remarkably quiet. There’s sound insulation under the bonnet that looks like an add-on but cuts out a lot of noise. There’s plenty of squeaking and rattling from around the back that could be the LPG tank moving on its mounting bracket. Mark Key can fit an LPG system for a remarkably cheap £535, but you lose most of the boot, so I wouldn’t bother. Save your money and buy the optional snow plough attachment. Yes, really.

The Niva seems at its most content at around 70mph on the motorway; above that speed, the mechanical noise gets a bit much. There’s no radio, but you can sing Russian marching songs or ‘The Red Flag’ to keep yourself entertained. A surprising number of young people look at the Niva, but it could be that they are young Russians wondering why on earth someone would want to drive a Niva when you can buy a third-hand E36 BMW M3 in the UK for less money.

As soon as the Niva’s Lada-made tyres touch mud, I get the thing stuck while attempting to show off its off-road ability for the photographer. Because the Niva is light, we are able to push it back onto firmer ground – something that would be difficult to do with a Range Rover. This car is Key’s only demo example, and since he is a one-man band it is imperative that I don’t damage it. With still-narrow mirrors and flat sides, it is easy to avoid catching the Niva’s sides on branches. Even if I do, the paint is a straight white and much easier to touch up than some candy apple flip-flop metallic chosen by Victoria Beckham.

Should I buy one?

Are you fed up yet with the underlying Luddite tone running through this feature? I’m sorry, but I can’t apologise. The Niva has practically no rivals. The Fiat Panda 4x4 hits the spot financially, but it isn’t as rugged and can only manage extreme postal deliveries in Scotland.

Other tough off-roaders are too expensive to abuse. Most will come with the option of Bluetooth connectivity but not with a snow plough. And few, I suspect, will have a handbook that declares that the vehicle is designed to operate between -40deg C and +45deg C temperatures.

Colin Goodwin

Lada Niva

Price £10,974; Top speed 91mph; 0-60mph 16.3sec; Economy 33mpg; C02 225g/km; Kerb weight 1210kg; Engine 4 cyls, 1690cc, petrol; Power 80bhp at 5000rpm; Torque 95lb ft at 4000rpm; Gearbox Dual-ratio 5-spd manual.

Join the debate

Comments
40

8 October 2011

A great review at long last, lovely to read a review from Mr Goodwin again.

8 October 2011

I am so glad that the Niva is available here again. Its rugged simplicity, offroad ability and charm make it like no other. What a great car!

8 October 2011

Really made me smile that, nice one!

8 October 2011

I've seen these in the interior of Iceland (country not frozen food shop) and the Niva does exactly what it says on the tin. GREAT CAR! Land Rover could do worse than to buy a few and evaluate them before going too hi-tech with the Defender replacement.

8 October 2011

or you could have an indian suzuki marutti gypsy 4x4, available in rhd.

www.KOOOLcr.com

 

8 October 2011

I suspect he will sell more of these than he anticipated, there are plenty of people who want a basic tough 4x4, and this has a wonderful image (even though the whole point of buying one is to buy something without an image).

I would like to think Land Rover will take this seriously in considering a new Defender, afterall if they built its replacement in India there is no reason for it to cost any more either

8 October 2011

Bloody marvellous!

This is the sort of car we need more of in this country. Not necessarily in the form of off roaders but a vehicle that is simple robust and cheap. Heck, they're even emission compliant!

Okay, it's not quick and probably doesn't meet any EuroNCAP requirements but will that concern any of it's potential customers - not a chance!

Mr Tey, if the rest of Lada's products are still this simple and cheap then do us a favour. Stick your neck out and bring in some other practical work horses such as estates and pick ups. I know I'm not the only one getting fed up with the over complexity of modern cars.

 

 

It's all about the twisties........

8 October 2011

[quote TegTypeR]

Bloody marvellous!

This is the sort of car we need more of in this country. Not necessarily in the form of off roaders but a vehicle that is simple robust and cheap. Heck, they're even emission compliant!

Okay, it's not quick and probably doesn't meet any EuroNCAP requirements but will that concern any of it's potential customers - not a chance!

Mr Tey, if the rest of Lada's products are still this simple and cheap then do us a favour. Stick your neck out and bring in some other practical work horses such as estates and pick ups. I know I'm not the only one getting fed up with the over complexity of modern cars.

[/quote]

+1.

I couldn't've put it better myself!

8 October 2011

I've just found the Lada web site!

http://www.ladacars.org/

Fantastic!!! lol.

They even do a long wheel base version!

Not so sure about the newer Chevrolet stuff though!

 

 

It's all about the twisties........

8 October 2011

I seem to remember that if you go for the van version the metal panels in the rear side windows are finished in black, so you can even get the 'privacy' glass look that so many people covet, all for a budget price!

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