Six new Lightweight E-types are made to the original specification, complete with 3.8-litre straight six engines
12 August 2014

Jaguar has unveiled the first of its reborn Lightweight E-types at the Pebble Beach Concours in California. Six units of the car will go on sale for an estimated £1 million apiece.

The new examples complete the ‘Special GT E-type’ project that was started in 1963. Just 12 of the planned 18-car original run were built. The remaining six chassis numbers are set to appear on the newly created examples.

Designed for racing, the Lightweight E-types will be built to the exact specification of the original cars, allowing them to be used in historic racing events.

Power comes from an aluminium-block 3.8-litre straight six engine, which turns out 335bhp and 280lb ft of torque. It drives through a four-speed manual gearbox and is based on the engine that powered the D-type to Le Mans victory in 1957.

Crucial to the E-type’s design is its lightweight aluminium bodyshell, which saves 114kg over the standard E-type. Jaguar engineers have decided to eschew modern construction methods, as used on the aluminium-bodied F-type and XJ, in favour of the original techniques.

Inner and outer surfaces of the car were digitally scanned, with most body panels then being reproduced at Jaguar’s Whitley engineering centre. With the bodywork complete, the cars will be mated to the engine’s subframe before being transferred to the company’s Browns Lane site to be completed.

The Lightweight E-type features twin-wishbone suspension at the front and an independent wide-based wishbone set-up at the rear, tuned to perform best under racing conditions. The E-type’s rack and pinion steering is fitted and the car sits on 15-inch wheels. An aluminium hard-top is also included.

Inside, aluminium bucket seats feature in a functional-looking cabin, which has a wood-trimmed steering wheel and push-button starter.

The project is being overseen by Jaguar Heritage, part of Jaguar Land Rover’s new Special Operations division. The car shown at Pebble Beach, a prototype model, has been dubbed Car Zero.

Jaguar design boss Ian Callum said: “With the Lightweight E-type, our focus as a design team has been to ensure justice was done to the original work of Sir William Lyons and Malcolm Sayer.

“I believe the result is a new Lightweight E-type that is as stunning now as the originals would have been when they were new.”

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12 August 2014

There will be a lot of disappointed collectors who won't be one of the 6!

XXXX's intellect just went POP!

12 August 2014

Quite right Gigglebug. Perhaps a Jaguar "researcher" will "discover" an old memo indicating that they had intended to make 50. It's amazing how much more you can ask when it's made by the "original manufacturer". The people who make very good recreations of C and D types could I am sure make a very nice E-type lightweight for rather less. There are fake Cobras and there are recently made Cobras signed off by Shelby himself. No need to ask which cost more.

12 August 2014

Wonder if they run a period spec Alloy Block, or a sorted out modern Crossthwaite and Gardener version like many of the modern E Type racers ?

12 August 2014

I think they've gone a bit too far in the interpretation. To me the end result looks like the sad reproduction in the corner of an antique store. I'd much rather have a real E-Type.

12 August 2014
soldi wrote:

I think they've gone a bit too far in the interpretation. To me the end result looks like the sad reproduction in the corner of an antique store. I'd much rather have a real E-Type.

Soldi, completely understand that you might not have bothered to read the article before you commented, but as these are being built to the original, exact specification, could you explain why you think "they've gone a bit to far in the interpretation"?

12 August 2014

then you will understand that Jaguar has not built to the original, exact specification. The quote of Ian Callum confirms it.

12 August 2014
soldi wrote:

then you will understand that Jaguar has not built to the original, exact specification. The quote of Ian Callum confirms it.

I did read the article, even Mr Callum's quotation, and I interpreted it that these are being built to the original, exact specification. However, I know sometimes I can make errors of interpretation, so I checked Jaguar's website and I quote - "All six vehicles will be built as perfect reproductions and to the exact specifications of the original 12 cars first produced in 1963".
I look forward to your admission of error.

12 August 2014
pauld101 wrote:

I look forward to your admission of error.

I suggest you do your homework before you claim these cars are to 'original, exact specification'.

There are many many key items that are different to the originals: Original 300hp, Repro 340hp, Original ZF 5-Speed, Repro Jag 4-Speed, Original: Lucas Fuel Injection, Repro Triple Weber.

Hardly original, exact specification.

Therefore I look forward to YOUR admission of exaggeration and error.

13 August 2014
soldi wrote:
pauld101 wrote:

I look forward to your admission of error.

I suggest you do your homework before you claim these cars are to 'original, exact specification'.

There are many many key items that are different to the originals: Original 300hp, Repro 340hp, Original ZF 5-Speed, Repro Jag 4-Speed, Original: Lucas Fuel Injection, Repro Triple Weber.

Hardly original, exact specification.

Therefore I look forward to YOUR admission of exaggeration and error.

When you're in a hole, best stop digging, or at least do your research better...
With regard to homework, can I point you in the direction of jaguarheritage.com/Content/Images/uploaded/pdf%20files/ltwt2.pdf
which will enlighten you as to the build specs of the lightweight cars. You will discover the use of close ratio E-Type gearboxes (the optional 5-speed ZF box development being incomplete and only fitted to some later cars).
Jaguar's sales material states " ...supplied with three 45DCO3 Weber carburettors. These were homologated by Jaguar for the Lightweight E-type in addition to a Lucas mechanical fuel injection system – which is being offered to customers as a cost-option...".
The Peter Lindnerl Peter Nocker lightweight E-type which ran at Le Mans in 1964 put out 344bhp. Cars were available with different engine tunes and exhaust systems depending on use, so the 300bhp was only the 'base' spec.
But of course, the give-away is your use of 'repro'. These cars are originals. A continuation of the original series. Built to the highest possible standard by a company that understands its heritage.
I therefore look forward to your admission of error.

13 August 2014
pauld101 wrote:

do your research better....

Using Jaguar to check Jaguar claims is like using the tax office to check if you're paying too much tax...... As a further illustration that Jag data may not be wholly reliable, all of the independent registers of the original Lightweights document that there were 13 built, not the 12 Jaguar claims........ So I guess it remains to be seen if these 6 reproductions will swell the numbers to 18 or 19.

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