Successor to the 650S will appear in 2018 with even more extreme styling than that of P1 hypercar

McLaren will replace its current 650S models with an all-new supercar in 2018, Autocar has learned. Currently referred to as the P14, the new model forms part of the British manufacturer’s commitment to launch a new model every year.

The car is expected to feature McLaren’s carbonfibre tub and 3.8-litre twin-turbocharged engine, although its power output will be extended beyond the 641bhpof the 650S.

Peak power of 660bhp would match the P14’s closest current rival, the Ferrari 488 GTB, and still allow the 675LT to crown McLaren’s Super Series range. However, because the 675LT is limited to just 500 units, McLaren may choose to surpass that car’s 666bhp output as well.

To beat the Ferrari, McLaren will have to ensure the P14 can reach 62mph in less than 3.0sec and attain a top speed of more than 205mph.

The P14’s styling is understood to represent a clean slate for McLaren, as well as setting the company’s design template for its next batch of models.

McLaren design director Frank Stephenson has already said the P14 will be “even crazier” than the P1 hypercar, but the company’s established hallmarks, such as its distinctive side-mounted air intakes and front bumper design, are likely to remain.

The P14 will still feature an extreme design language, because McLaren regards this as a way to keep the emotion associated with its brand at a high level.

An open-top variant is also planned and, like today’s 650S Spider, it will feature a folding hard-top roof. Although the 650S Spider was launched at the Geneva motor show in 2014 alongside the 650S Coupé, McLaren’s current launch strategy means the convertible P14 is likely to be seen around a year after the coupé goes on sale.

Prices for the P14 are expected to rise over those of the current 650S, which is £192,250 in coupé form and £215,250 as a convertible.

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Our Verdict

McLaren 650S
The McLaren 650S is much faster and more exciting to drive than the regular 12C

The latest addition to McLaren's line-up may be based on the 12C, but this is a whole new ball-game

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Comments
9

3 August 2015
Supercars, above all else, need a clear identity. Looking like a CAD-designed Ferrari clone simply won't do. McLaren always seems to be a work in progress, like a slightly more competent Lotus. And we won't even mention the Nurburgring debacle...

3 August 2015
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TBC

3 August 2015
One wonders just how McLaren will squeeze more power from their existing unit. Seeing how expensive batteries seem to be, and unless some technological leap in the next 12 months radically reduces their price, they will most likely be limited to the P1s replacement. Alternatively, they may choose to provide some sort of E-boost to provide torque fill allowing them to increase boost. As Ferrari has now embraced turbocharging, it will be interesting to see which alternatives the rivals choose over the next few years.

3 August 2015
I don't hold a brief for either McLaren or Ferrari, seeing virtues in both, but I note that McLaren seems to have no trouble selling cars that "simply won't do", I also note that the 911 has been a "work in progress" for 50+ years, and that Ferrari, whose cars, I'm sure, also benefit from CAD, has followed McLaren by using turbos in this sector of the market.

3 August 2015
275not599 wrote:
I don't hold a brief for either McLaren or Ferrari, seeing virtues in both, but I note that McLaren seems to have no trouble selling cars that "simply won't do", I also note that the 911 has been a "work in progress" for 50+ years, and that Ferrari, whose cars, I'm sure, also benefit from CAD, has followed McLaren by using turbos in this sector of the market.
Sure they are selling but people see them as constantly chasing Ferrari and trying to beat Ferrari at their own game. Mclaren would benefit from stop trying to beat Ferrari (just to lose every time) and build their own identity, just like Porsche. To make ever more strange design with a lot of wings and aero parts is creating one bland car after another. And Ferrari was forced to go turbo by unfair competition. While Ferrari made worlds best NA engine with highest hp/L output than any sports car, all the competition did was add ever bigger turbos to beat Ferrari. So emissions was not the biggest reason. You want to blame someone for the amazing NA engines disappearing, blame the lazy and unfair competition. You know who.

bezor Ta

4 August 2015
275not599 wrote:
Ferrari, whose cars, I'm sure, also benefit from CAD, has followed McLaren by using turbos in this sector of the market.
I must admit, I never thought I would see the day when somebody claimed that Ferrari were "following" McLaren. It's a bit like claiming the James Bond franchise has been ripping off the Bourne films.

3 August 2015
I thought, just for a moment, someone was going to say it looks like an R8, whose side blades have morphed a bit in latest generation. Who would think it, an Audi that looks like a McLaren that is looking like a "CAD-designed Ferrari clone" ! I've only seen a couple of McLarens on the road, they looked great to me and I was in no doubt what they were. But those were older ones of course. Just hope there is no hyper-SUV anywhere in the making. Unless it is mid-engined.

3 August 2015
Seems a strange choice to announce 3 years ahead of time unless they're trying to undermine sales in the 650S. As for hybrid power, it wouldn't be very expensive in the scheme of a £200,000 machine to add a "basic" torque fill system, with no aspirations of pure electric running, of the order of, say 2KWh (so, for example, 100KW for ~1 minute). Tesla's Gigafactory will be at full tilt then, so the cost should be down around $150 per KWh for the battery component, and <15kg for the whole battery unit (also an electric motor etc to add). Personally I hope they don't make the styling too mental. I'd rather have something that pleases the eye than assaults it. Getting rid of those headlamps would be a start.

3 August 2015
I love great NA engines too! Some of my favorite cars are Ferraris! But I don't see everything through Ferrari glasses. NA screamers do have great horsepower per litre, not so good torque per litre, which is a very valid alternative, particularly when you are not on a predictable circuit but on a road. I disagree with you that fitting turbos is unfair competition; it just produces a different set of performance characteristics. There is also no doubt in my mind that the move to turbos is driven by concerns regarding emissions and fuel economy, which is in part why the big players in F1 told Bernie "turbos or we walk". I agree that turbos usually make an engine less vocal, but I think Ferrari has done something about that!

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