Full-size SUV planned; will be co-developed with Mercedes and carry the Aston Martin name
15 October 2013

Aston Martin chairman and CEO Dr Ulrich Bez has confirmed that the company is working to ensure a full-sized SUV that will carry the Lagonda name will reach production. 

When asked about the state of the plans first made public with the reveal of the controversial Lagonda concept at the Geneva show in 2009, Bez replied, ‘have we got prototypes running around getting ready for production? No. Is it something that’s still on the radar? Absolutely yes."

It is believed the recently announced ‘technical partnership’ between Mercedes tuning division AMG and Aston Martin is what has provided the impetus to turn the idea of an Aston SUV into an intention. Referring to the VW Touareg and Porsche Cayenne, Bez said, “If you look at how Porsche and Volkswagen worked together to produce two completely different cars, it would be possible to have a similar arrangement with Mercedes so long as our car was clearly and distinctly an Aston Martin.”

The wording is significant because the original plan was to relaunch Lagonda as a brand on its own. Now and partly informed by the collapse of Mercedes’ premium brand Maybach, the Lagonda name will be used, but as a model, not a marque.

“In places where this car must sell, like China, no-one has even heard of Lagonda,” said Bez. “We are working hard to build Aston Martin over there so what’s the point of doing it all over again with a name no-one knows? We can call the car Lagonda, and even put the Lagonda wings on it, but it would be an Aston Martin Lagonda.”

With ink barely dry on the AMG contract, no-one is talking about a possible timeframe in which the Lagonda might appear, although it seems likely that the very first fruits of the collaboration are a minimum of two years away.

The most likely scenario for the Lagonda is that it would be based on the next generation of M-class which, given Mercedes' current lifecycles, would time its arrival for some time in 2017. 

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15 October 2013

Apparently Charles Morgan stepped down because he disagreed with company's plans to build an ash-framed SUV with sliding-pillar suspension and 1930s styling cues.

A company spokesman said: We have identified huge potential sales for such a vehicle in emerging markets like India and China which we cannot stand by and watch our competitors steal from under our noses.'

15 October 2013

Lagonda is what the Rapid should have been called. I quite like the styling of this, but think it would work much better as a saloon tourer than SUV. I understand the need, but seriously, how many premium SUVs does one world need? After years of getting vehicles lower and more sleek, we are know building cars the size of 1930s Bentleys.

15 October 2013
marj wrote:

how many premium SUVs does one world need?

It's the most rapidly expanding automotive sector, so Aston needs to be in it. Look at what entering the sector did for Porsche. It's a no-brainer.

16 October 2013
kraftwerk wrote:
marj wrote:

how many premium SUVs does one world need?

It's the most rapidly expanding automotive sector, so Aston needs to be in it. Look at what entering the sector did for Porsche. It's a no-brainer.

Kraftwerk, I know it is the most rapidly growing sector, but it is still quite small. I am not sure it can sustain 9 possibly 10 manufacturers on the current sales projections. Everyone wants to come to the party but some have been there all night and still going strong. With Aston, bentley and possibly even Rolls Royce launching SUVs, these will be very niche vehicles indeed. Also, Aston hasn't exactly set the world on fire with its Rapide. They also need to develop or borrow a 4 wheel drive system so development costs will be astronomical for possibly only 1000 units a year.

15 October 2013

It would be a mistake to follow the trend. All mainstream manufacturers now sell trucks of this size, and thus the distinction of blotting out sunlight that the Range Rover once had tyo itself has been lost.

The solution is obvious. Aston needs a car that is much taller, heavier, longer and wider than a Range Rover. One that can intimidate SUV drivers in the way their cars do now drivers of small cars. Otherwise it will Aston will just me making an ordinary small car.

Mercedes have just such a vehicle in the 6x6. This is the template Aston should use for the SUV, and becomes more possible thanks to the recent tie up between the two companies.

I can't wait for the day my 10 tonne, 20 litre, 6x6 supermini to be delivered. I will have the optional conservatory and swimming pool with mine and a patio on the roof please.Or may I wait for 8x8 version.

15 October 2013

....the only way to impress upon the buying public how refined and gentlemanly this new conveyance will be - and how unlike such vulgarities as the Cayenne and the Range Rover and the forthcoming Bentley SUV (which after all are FOREIGN) - is to make it as big as a house with an engine the size of Fukushima. Adding another pair of wheels will serve to underline this effortless superiority for anyone too thick to appreciate the enormity of the price.

15 October 2013

Does the world need another Mercedes-Benz ML-based SUV?

We've already had the Mercedes-Benz GL, the SsangYong Rexton and Jeep Grand Cherokee.

I suppose if you accept that Cadillac Escalade is bought by Americans, they'll buy anything!

15 October 2013

Just one thing comes to mind, Aston Martin is a premium British manufacturer who produce sports cars for this market, please don't waste your time and resources and this kind of pointless marketing led garbage, get your main product line right

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