Facelift brings potent turbocharged four-cylinder engines and a new name for Porsche’s two-seat roadster line-up
26 January 2016

The most powerful version of Porsche’s all-new, turbocharged four-cylinder petrol engine 
will have a capacity of 2.5 litres and produce up to 345bhp in the facelifted Boxster S.

The model, which has been renamed 718 Boxster S following Porsche’s decision to resurrect its hallowed 718 nomenclature, has been given its first public airing at the Geneva motor show in March. The revised two-seater will be joined by the more keenly priced 718 Boxster, which runs a 2.0-litre variant of the horizontally opposed four-cylinder turbo engine making 296bhp.

Read our full review of the Porsche 718 Boxster here

The new models will be available from April, with an even more powerful 718 Boxster GTS due next year. At £41,739, the 718 Boxster is priced £1641 above the outgoing Boxster, while the 718 Boxster S costs £50,685, £2142 more than the Boxster S.

Distinguishing the 718 Boxster and 718 Boxster S from the outgoing models is a series of styling changes, including a new front bumper sporting larger cooling ducts, and larger air ducts in front of the rear wheel arches. The rear sports a distinctive new accent strip between the tail-lights to give additional visual width.

The 718 Boxster is the first Porsche to be powered by a four-cylinder engine since the 968 ceased production in 1995. Development of the new unit was overseen by Wolfgang Hatz, the head of Porsche’s research and development operations suspended in the aftermath of parent company Volkswagen’s dieselgate affair.

The new engine is also earmarked to replace the existing flat six in the 718 Cayman.

With 296bhp and 280lb ft, 
the 2.0-litre unit makes 25bhp and 66lb ft more than the naturally aspirated 2.7-litre flat six it replaces in the outgoing entry-level Porsche roadster.

Significantly, peak torque appears 1500rpm earlier in the rev range than with the old six-cylinder unit, leading to what Porsche describes as “added levels of low-end urge and greater mid-range flexibility”.   

The 718 Boxster S 
receives a larger, 2.5-litre variant of the flat four turbo powerplant in place of the naturally aspirated 3.4-litre six-cylinder unit currently used. With 345bhp and 310lb ft between 1900 and 4500rpm, the new engine offers a 25bhp increase in output over the 
unit it replaces, along with a 37lb ft lift in torque.

As before, the most affordable of Porsche’s 
sports car models offer the choice of a standard six-speed manual or optional seven-speed PDK dual-clutch automatic gearbox, the latter of which has been updated 
with a new software package that’s said to provide added fuel-saving potential.

Porsche says the 718 Boxster has a 0-62mph time of 4.7sec and a 171mph top speed when fitted with the optional PDK gearbox, bettering its predecessor by 0.9sec and 5mph respectively.The 718 Boxster S has claimed figures of 4.2sec 
and 177mph, in the process beating the official 0-62mph time of the 380bhp 3.8-litre 
six-cylinder Cayman GT4 
by 0.2sec.

As well as providing added power, the new four-cylinder engine also brings a significant improvement in fuel economy over the outgoing six-cylinder engine. The 718 Boxster returns a claimed 40.9mpg on the combined cycle and the 718 Boxster S promises 38.7mpg in combination with the PDK gearbox, representing improvements of 5.1mpg and 4.2mpg respectively.

Along with the new engine, the 718 Boxster features what Porsche describes as a “sportier tuning of the chassis”. Among the changes is a revised electro-mechanical steering system that is said to be 10% more direct than the set-up used on the outgoing Boxsters. Porsche’s Active Suspension Management (PASM) continues to be offered as an option, offering a nominal 10mm reduction in ride height over the standard suspension.

Speaking to Autocar at the Geneva show, Porsche Boxster boss Stefan Weckbach confirmed that far higher states of tune are available on the new flat-four engine. "350hp is not the end of the engine," he said "There is plenty of room for more."

Despite there being scope to develop the new engine further, Weckbach said there are currently no plans for Porsche to install the unit into other models, including the 911. Observers have likened the sound of the unit to that of a Subaru WRC car. The exhaust note is amplified into the cabin, officials have confirmed, but no extra software is used to enhance its sound. 

Read our first ride in the Porsche 718 Boxster

Our Verdict

Porsche Boxster
The Boxster is the cheapest Porsche you can buy

Does bigger mean better for Porsche’s third-generation Boxster?

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Comments
18

27 January 2016
At the risk of incurring the wrath of Winnie, I think that the car industry is being asked to shoulder an excessive burden in the fight against the human contribution to what may be a cyclical change in global temperatures. Other industries, such as food production and energy, are major generators of greenhouse gasses. Producing a pound of beef generates 11 times as much greenhouse gas as producing a pound of chicken, and 100 times as much as producing a pound of carrots. I would have more time for people like Winnie if they stopped eating beef, bought second hand cars and lived in houses that may be smaller but nevertheless sufficient, and then turned down the thermostat and put on a pullover. I will be astonished if the 4 cyl turbo Boxster is as soul-stirring as the outgoing NA 6 cyl, and just imagine what the latter would be like if it had received the sort of design and development attention that the new model has benefitted from. There is so much more to the enjoyment of a car than the raw numbers and the associated bragging rights. The Alfa 1600 GT Junior I once owned scraped to 60 in barely under 10 seconds but was bliss to drive.

27 January 2016
275not599 wrote:
At the risk of incurring the wrath of Winnie, I think that the car industry is being asked to shoulder an excessive burden in the fight against the human contribution to what may be a cyclical change in global temperatures. Other industries, such as food production and energy, are major generators of greenhouse gasses. Producing a pound of beef generates 11 times as much greenhouse gas as producing a pound of chicken, and 100 times as much as producing a pound of carrots. I would have more time for people like Winnie if they stopped eating beef, bought second hand cars and lived in houses that may be smaller but nevertheless sufficient, and then turned down the thermostat and put on a pullover. I will be astonished if the 4 cyl turbo Boxster is as soul-stirring as the outgoing NA 6 cyl, and just imagine what the latter would be like if it had received the sort of design and development attention that the new model has benefitted from. There is so much more to the enjoyment of a car than the raw numbers and the associated bragging rights. The Alfa 1600 GT Junior I once owned scraped to 60 in barely under 10 seconds but was bliss to drive.
Dude, it isn't me or what I think. Its the UK / EU, pretty much the entire developed world (apart from the USA)... they have committed to zero carbon by 2050. This means very low levels of fossil fuel burning in general and almost zero fossil fuel burning that will create CO2 in cars and transportation. The paper bag offer is still open for your wife's Civic.

27 January 2016
winniethewoo wrote:
275not599 wrote:
At the risk of incurring the wrath of Winnie, I think that the car industry is being asked to shoulder an excessive burden in the fight against the human contribution to what may be a cyclical change in global temperatures. Other industries, such as food production and energy, are major generators of greenhouse gasses. Producing a pound of beef generates 11 times as much greenhouse gas as producing a pound of chicken, and 100 times as much as producing a pound of carrots. I would have more time for people like Winnie if they stopped eating beef, bought second hand cars and lived in houses that may be smaller but nevertheless sufficient, and then turned down the thermostat and put on a pullover. I will be astonished if the 4 cyl turbo Boxster is as soul-stirring as the outgoing NA 6 cyl, and just imagine what the latter would be like if it had received the sort of design and development attention that the new model has benefitted from. There is so much more to the enjoyment of a car than the raw numbers and the associated bragging rights. The Alfa 1600 GT Junior I once owned scraped to 60 in barely under 10 seconds but was bliss to drive.
Dude, it isn't me or what I think. Its the UK / EU, pretty much the entire developed world (apart from the USA)... they have committed to zero carbon by 2050. This means very low levels of fossil fuel burning in general and almost zero fossil fuel burning that will create CO2 in cars and transportation. The paper bag offer is still open for your wife's Civic.
It's total absurdity to commit to something that can not possibly be achieved. The science is utterly flawed. When governments get involved with something like climate change you should know that it's about tax and view any findings as a cynical appeal to people's kind nature to do something good for themselves in order to tax the shit out of them.


27 January 2016
winniethewoo wrote:
pretty much the entire developed world (apart from the USA)... they have committed to zero carbon by 2050
That is arrant nonsense, I'm afraid. The COP 21 "Agreement" is nothing of the sort, with no binding treaty. The world's major industrial powers have sensibly opted to ignore the pseudo-science being thrown at them by Obama, the EU and various Marxist academics. And you can understand why; in lieu of *any* evidence to support their scaremongering, they can't even agree which data to fit to their wonky computer models.

27 January 2016
Norma Smellons][quote=winniethewoo wrote:
The world's major industrial powers have sensibly opted to ignore the pseudo-science being thrown at them by Obama, the EU and various Marxist academics. And you can understand why; in lieu of *any* evidence to support their scaremongering, they can't even agree which data to fit to their wonky computer models.
Yeah, those bloody Marxists, trying to keep us alive. Beatniks. How about you strap your mouth to a diesel exhaust pipe and see how long you last..

29 January 2016
Norma Smellons wrote:
winniethewoo wrote:
pretty much the entire developed world (apart from the USA)... they have committed to zero carbon by 2050
That is arrant nonsense, I'm afraid. The COP 21 "Agreement" is nothing of the sort, with no binding treaty. The world's major industrial powers have sensibly opted to ignore the pseudo-science being thrown at them by Obama, the EU and various Marxist academics. And you can understand why; in lieu of *any* evidence to support their scaremongering, they can't even agree which data to fit to their wonky computer models.
Like strawmen much? Read what I said and then look on the government websites.

27 January 2016
I THOUGHT THE PRICE WILL BE HALF. EXHAUST SOUND IS NOT AT ALL GOOD. SOUNDS LIKE VACCUM CLEANER SAD NEWS... HOPE I WILL GET GT4 WITH PDK.

27 January 2016
until a 6 cylinder version comes along. I'm not interested in getting to 60 0.2 seconds faster. I like the styling changes and the precedent set by the new turbo 911 is good but no thanks for the time being.

27 January 2016
until a 6 cylinder version comes along. I'm not interested in getting to 60 0.2 seconds faster. I like the styling changes and the precedent set by the new turbo 911 is good but no thanks for the time being.

27 January 2016
Cracking effort Porsche, looking forward to the Cayman.

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