The system could eventually increase EV range by ‘electrifying’ motorways like the M25

The world’s first market-ready wireless charging system for electric cars has been launched in London.

The system, launched by start-up business, HaloIPT, part-owned by the global design consultancy ARUP, promises secure and simple on-street charging and could eventually increase EV range by ‘electrifying’ motorways such as the M25.

The charging system – which depends on principles discovered in the early 1800s and refined in modern industry for 20 years – allows a car fitted with a simple integrated receiver pad to charge automatically when parked or driven on roads with HaloIPT’s special charging pads beneath their surface.

The system can be configured to power all vehicles, from earthmovers to microcars, and is developed to be tolerant of misalignment by the driver, and safe from hazards such as ice and snow, or even animals sitting under cars.

Called IPT (for Induction Power Transfer), the system offers very similar charging performance to the charging post and cable more common today.

A typical city car like the Electric Car Company’s Citroën C1-based Evie, which is currently being used extensively for UK road trials, can be fully charged from about 20 per cent in six to seven hours, using a regular household socket. The system can work over air gaps up to 40 centimetres, considerably more than an average car’s ground clearance.

Read Autocar's review of the Nissan Leaf

HaloIPT’s CEO, Anthony Thomson, likens the move from sockets and cables to wireless charging as similar to society’s adoption of mobile phones and wi-fi.

“We’re using IPT to break down the barriers to mass-market adoption of electric cars,” he says. “Keeping electric vehicle costs down is a key priority for us.”

If fitted with wireless charging, HaloIPT believes an electric vehicle’s emissions should be around one-third of those of a similar petrol vehicle by 2030, taking into account lifetime carbon use, the electricity generation process and the systems needed to deliver petrol/diesel to conventional vehicles.

Collaborative companies, Delphi Automotive and WiTricity, are currently in the development stages of a similar system, which will also charge EVs wirelessly.

Read about Delphi Automotive and WiTricity's wireless charging plans

Steve Cropley

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Comments
14

29 October 2010

Sir Clive Sinclair was laughed at when he proposed similar ideas 25 years ago. What's changed?

The cost and disruption of fitting charging points to public roads and (eventually) running an electric charging cordon around motorways would be horrendous.

For a start, how much will it cost and who will pay for it?

29 October 2010

[quote Oilburner]Sir Clive Sinclair was laughed at when he proposed similar ideas 25 years ago. What's changed?[/quote]

The fact that everything is driven purely on reducing CO2, government policy and taxation. 25 years ago people were worried about acid rain.

I agree about the potential horrific costs of digging up motorways to install this IPT system. I don't understand very much about the science here, is is constantly 'emitting' power? Or does it only send electricity across the air gap when a vehicle drives, or parks, over it and 'demands' it?


29 October 2010

[quote Oilburner]What's changed?[/quote] With a company such as ARUP backing this enterprise I would guess that it has a very good chance of being both cost-effective and viable in the medium-term. Having a system that charges a parked vehicle without any trailing cables sounds eminently sensible. It would surely be easy enough to lay charging pads under a road surface as and when it is renewed, it does not have to be done all in one go surely ?


Enjoying a Fabia VRs - affordable performance

29 October 2010

And at what cost to the environment all that electricity? We can't supply more than a fraction of our current needs cleanly so what chance once every car in the country is gobbling up the stuff? Let's put all this effort into hydrogen fuel cells rather than this stop gap technology.

29 October 2010

If you ask anyone who works in the national grid, they all say the same, in order to power electric cars to the same speed as filling up, you have to re-wire the whole national grid and that alone destroys the 'cleansing the enviroment' rubbish, not to mention the disposal of battery's etc, all that will have a bigger impact on global warming then running a w16 quad turbo supercar. Personally i don't electric vehicles/hybrids will catch on, just ask Ferninand Porsche. Way too many variables to consider, as long as biofuels are renewable and they can produce genetically modified crops, someone somewhere could maybe combine both and have a breakthrough. Otherwise, once Canada find a way of drawing out the oil from underneath them, theres still life left in the combustion engine yet.

29 October 2010

[quote Lesia44]Let's put all this effort into hydrogen fuel cells[/quote] Where does the hydrogen come from? [quote Lesia44]so what chance once every car in the country is gobbling up the stuff?[/quote] How quickly is that realistically going to happen?

29 October 2010

[quote MrTrilby][quote Lesia44]Let's put all this effort into hydrogen fuel cells[/quote] Where does the hydrogen come from? [quote Lesia44]so what chance once every car in the country is gobbling up the stuff?[/quote] How quickly is that realistically going to happen?[/quote]

Halfway down the page here... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrogen_vehicle

How quickly is any of this going to happen and should we be giving more though to which road we go down lest we possibly invest too much effort in another dead end?

29 October 2010

Transmitting the amount of electricity necessary to re-charge a car's traction battery will generate significant heat and electro-magnetic energy. How will this affect other electrical devices in the immediate vicinity - mobile phones, computers, hearing aids, pace-makers, not to mention the other cars around it, each of which has a number of very sensitive ECUs?

29 October 2010

[quote silverserfer]

Transmitting the amount of electricity necessary to re-charge a car's traction battery will generate significant heat and electro-magnetic energy. How will this affect other electrical devices in the immediate vicinity - mobile phones, computers, hearing aids, pace-makers, not to mention the other cars around it, each of which has a number of very sensitive ECUs?

[/quote]

I was wondering the same, from simple interference (like how a mobile phone affects the TV) right down to zapping peoples pacemakers!

29 October 2010

How long before wireless electric motorways get blamed for initiating cancer or infertility or some equally horrible illness?

A few years ago all hell broke loose about limiting mobile phone usage, preventing children from using them etc.

I'm not saying I'm against the idea, it sounds brilliant, but there is some convincing to do before the technology becomes reality.

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