Revolutionary new tech will allow EVs to be charged without the use of conventional charging cables

Two leading automotive electrical firms are developing revolutionary wireless electric charging systems for electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles.

Delphi Automotive and WiTricity Corp are working in collaboration on a system that works by wirelessly charging a car over its energy source that sits on the garage floor, or is embedded in a paved parking spot. The system also allows for more misalignment than inductive systems and can transfer power "efficiently over significantly larger distances" than conventional systems.

See diagrams of how the tech works

According to WiTricity boss Eric Giler: "Charging an electric car should be as easy as parking it in your garage or parking spot". According to Giler, WiTricity’s wireless system can already transfer over 3300 watts - enough to fully charge an electric car at the same rate as most residential plug sockets.

"This is groundbreaking technology that could enable automotive manufacturers to integrate wireless charging directly into the design of their hybrid and electric vehicles" said Randy Sumner, Delphi development boss.

No indication has been made of when the system can be expected.

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Comments
12

25 October 2010

If this system could be built into our roads, say at road junctions, or on motorways, then maybe we'd have the prospect of charging electric cars dynamically while in use.

The prospect of full size Scalextric cars, without the need for big heavy batteries, might be the most exciting development yet for the future of the electric car.

Could such a system be practical?

25 October 2010

no

25 October 2010

Here on the continent we already have such a Scalextric concept in practice. To make it more efficient it is using rather large vehicles. We called it "train". The distance-charing concept certainly has merits, but inevitably will also be less energy-efficient. And to my feeling even 5~10% would be inacceptable, considering how much manufacturers are struggling for much less efficiency gains...

25 October 2010

I struggle to see the advantage of this in the same way as I struggle to see the advantage of those wireless charging mats that you can buy for your mobile phone and MP3 player. Plugging something in is just no big deal plus it is a lot easier to have an outside power point fitted to your house or garage than the entire drive or garage floor dug up to have this equipment fitted.

25 October 2010

If we cant maintain pothole free roads how would we do with electrics built in

25 October 2010

We hear a lot about mis-fuelling of diesel cars , so the same thing is likely to happen here. What happens if you park a petrol car over an "energy source" ? A very big bang for your buck ?

25 October 2010

It does address some issue for me which is the potential ease of unwanted disconnection, safety and vandalism of a wired connection. Not sure how the current road side plugins stop these.

25 October 2010

[quote Uncle Mellow]What happens if you park a petrol car over an "energy source" ? A very big bang for your buck ?[/quote]

Hopefully not but... I work in mobile telecomms where charging pads are all the rage right now. I have seen somebody put an Oyster card on a prototype charging pad. Melted the Oyster Card.

On the upside, perhaps it will melt any G-Whiz that stops on top of it.

25 October 2010

[quote Walking]It does address some issue for me which is the potential ease of unwanted disconnection, safety and vandalism of a wired connection. Not sure how the current road side plugins stop these.[/quote]

The Renault system has a lock and key that they seem to feel is pretty much vandalproof.

Me? I always back the vandals in these situations.

25 October 2010

[quote RobotBoogie]

The Renault system has a lock and key that they seem to feel is pretty much vandalproof.

Me? I always back the vandals in these situations.

[/quote]

Would we see vandals digging up the road in charging zones and nick the wiring like they do with train signalling wire?


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