Current-generation XK to be the last model to use oval grille hallmark, says design boss
8 December 2013

The current Jaguar XK will be the last model to feature the firm’s famed oval grille, design director Ian Callum has revealed.

All future Jaguars will instead feature a trapezoidal-shaped grille that’s more forceful and upright, as seen most recently in different interpretations on the F-type and C-X17.

Callum also said the firm would have to look at the role of the XK in its future line-up, following the arrival of the F-type. “A direction change is a valid question,” he said. “The XK will have a different job to do.”

It has previously been suggested that the XK would push upmarket into a larger and more luxurious GT car in its next generation, leaving the F-type to fill the role of Jaguar's full-blooded sports model.

Callum has previously told media that he did look at giving the F-type an oval grille, but decided against it has he wanted the model to represent change within the brand. He said the F-type's grille was inspired by the original Jaguar XJ

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8 December 2013
The oval grill on the XK looked great when it was introduced. And ever since they have added extra ducts, vents, etc, resulting in the front of the XK looking over done. I know looks are subjective, but i cant be alone is feeling rather disappointed at the direction Jaguar have been going in.

8 December 2013
So Jaguar are to lose the oval grill,another step in the update of the range. The updates so far have been liked by many,and sales continue to rise,i have to ask,could not Alfa do the same?. Ok the models on sale are perhaps not that good,barr the 4c but I think it could well be the right way to go.

8 December 2013
I've been against losing Jaguars oval grill from day 1. To me the present F Type, as much as I like it, looks from the front a cross between a Maserati and a Mercedes, not very Jaguar.

8 December 2013
I do like the oval grill that's been on Jaguar sports cars since probably the E-Type? However, Jaguar seriously required an update. The traditional XJ look was dated; proven by the X-Type not being the success that Jaguar hoped it would be. For Jaguar to then bring out a super modern all-aluminium XJ brimming with technology yet still looking like a car from the '70s is a sure sign of insanity. Thankfully Ian Callum as able to update the XJ and what a stunning looking car he delivered. When it comes to the XK I have to trust Ian Callum. He is, after all, a design genus. If he's not the best designer of his generations he's certainly in the top 1.

507

8 December 2013
Any comparison between E-type and F-type reveals an alarming degree of modern illiteracy when it comes to car design! Callum can only do further harm to Jaguar the longer he is employed. Why, oh why did not Jaguar do with the E-type what Porsche did with the 911, honing a success into more and more profit by keeping the main concept!

8 December 2013
Balance and positioning of badge to grille always affects the face. One thing I’ve never seen written about (probably because there are more pressing concerns to be worrying about) is the badge and placement of said badge in the grille. With the arrival of the XF Jaguar did a retreat of the badge with a dual ring that I always felt was terribly heavy handed and unresolved. Its placement in the grille did give it a prominence but to the detriment of subtlety and balance; it made it look like the vehicles had a cork stuck in their teeth. Jaguar redesigned the badge again only a few years later taking away the cygnet ring and reducing the weight and size. But I always find myself wanting them to stick the badge on the bonnet. I know that traditionally Jaguars have always had the badge in the grille – but it always nags at me, with the current forms it just never looks correct there, jaguar don’t seem fully convinced either with the amount of minor size alterations they’ve tried. It took jaguar 4 retreats to arrive at the correct lens size, and air intakes for the XK. The same with the XF grille and lenses. I know the economics of production often dictate what a manufacturer can achieve design wise in relation to budget. But I wonder how much of it has been restrictions of budget or just not quite getting it right. I’m a huge jaguar fan, I love the brand and would take the character and design of an XJ over its competitors every time. But to my eyes only the FTYPE seems to have come out of the blocks fully resolved. Obviously only one mans opinion.

9 December 2013
[quote=lines]Balance and positioning of badge to grille always affects the face. [/quote] Quite true. But the badge on the back leaves an even bigger impression. I've always thought the leaper on the bootlid was wrong way round. To my western eyes, the big cat should be leaping from left to right, not the other way round.

507

8 December 2013
When I compare the F-type with the old E-type, Jaguar has more than the badge to worry about. I do hope Jaguar survives though. Can´t but Think though that if they had built their cars like the guys in Stuttgart (not that Mercedes was ever flawless) instead of letting British Leyland and Ford take over, Jaguar might have been in the position BMW is in today!

8 December 2013
[quote=507]Can´t but Think though that if they had built their cars like the guys in Stuttgart (not that Mercedes was ever flawless) instead of letting British Leyland and Ford take over, Jaguar might have been in the position BMW is in today![/quote] Ford were good for Jaguar; their quality systems improved enormously. The cars were better built, with parts which lasted longer. They became reliable; not something you could always attribute to any BL product! Where Ford failed with Jaguar was sticking to the tired old design language. This is the key difference with Tata. They've been brave enough to let Ian Callum do his magic on the design. It's giving Jaguar a future and that shouldn't be underestimated. A lot has also had to change with the workers in the UK car industry too. Workers willing to adapt to new methods have given companies confidence that they can invest in the UK car industry. That again is a major difference from the BL days, and quite frankly one advantage they had in Stuttgart! Apparently for every day lost to strikes in Germany the UK lost over ten! Germany they had a working collective between workers and management to improve the company. In the UK we had unions fighting a class war that nobody knows where the battle lines were drawn. Especially when you discover how much the union leaders are earning! Jaguar owes it's survival first to Ford and then Tata. If you want a comparison then GM with Saab. Or more recently GM with Chevrolet. Wonder what they'll do with Vauxhall?

9 December 2013
What's going on Autocar? You made a ridiculous statement about the oval grill being from the XJ. Two posts calling you out on this have been removed, along with the original stupid statement. Now you've removed a post pointing out that the two posts and original statement were removed. No doubt this comment will also be removed. But if you're going to write an article about the oval grill, perhaps you'd do well to do a little bit of research, and get your facts right.

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