F1 will switch to 1.6-litre four-cylinder turbocharged engines from 2013

Formula One will switch to turbocharged four-cylinder engines from 2013, the FIA has revealed.

The new 1.6-litre engines will replace the current 2.4-litre V8s as part of F1’s drive to improve economy and lower emissions.

Alan Henry blog: F1 set for radical changes in 2013

The turbo units, which last appeared in F1 back in 1988, will be limited to 12,000rpm although an extended use of KERS systems should keep power at current levels. Economy should improve by around 35 per cent.

Teams will only be allowed five engines per season from 2013, and this will be reduced to four from 2014. Gearboxes will have to last five races, not the four at present.

The FIA has also removed the rule banning team orders from 2011, although teams can still be charged with bringing the sport intro disrepute.

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10 December 2010

"The FIA has also removed the rule banning team orders from 2011, although teams can still be charged with bringing the sport intro disrepute."

Hmmmm.... that sound like an area for abuse by Bernie if he wants to (allegedly) manipulate the results.

 

 

It's all about the twisties........

10 December 2010

I like the idea of the 1.6 turbo engines - more relevant to mass production cars, though I wonder what they will sound like.

As for removing the rules about team orders, I am in two minds. On one hand, if it's the last race of the season and switching driver positions could win a championship I can see the appeal, but on the other hand, I want to see drivers race and not hand each other points. Perhaps it's a case of what I don't know won't harm me; if teams can implement team orders subtly it shouldn't detract from the racing.

10 December 2010

Hmmmm a 4 banger Ferrari, who'd a thought that would happen?

10 December 2010

[quote WooDz]Hmmmm a 4 banger Ferrari, who'd a thought that would happen?[/quote]

We're used to 'V' engines in F1, we've had them exclusively for over 25 years, but Ferrari did run the bulk of the mid-1950's F1 with a four-cylinder engine. Technically it was an F2 car but F1 adopted the F2 rules to bolster grids and it stuck for a few seasons.

The Ferrari 500 started as a 1.9 I4, IIRC, and finished as a 2.5 I4.


10 December 2010

I'm not sure F1's going the right way at the moment, fair enough we all want drivers to be able to actually overtake and budgets have gone a bit mental over the last decade but surely these rules are pushing designers down a very narrow path and closing off the potential for innovation that makes F1 what it is. Do these rules really allow the Chapmans, Barnards and Neweys of the future to shine? I'm not sure... I personally don't want F1 to become a glorified Formula Ford. [quote WooDz]Hmmmm a 4 banger Ferrari, who'd a thought that would happen?[/quote] Good question Woodz, answer it won't anytime soon. Ironically, these regs might tempt Toyota back, they'd only have to dump a couple of turbos on a Prius to have a more competitive car than they had in 2009.

10 December 2010

Why not 1.0 liter 3-cylinder engines, this is even more relevant to production cars... come on, F1 has to have a bit of excess..

10 December 2010

If they want to lower emissions, they should lower the number of GPs from the proposed 20 and hold them in less far off places. I think you could run a whole season's worth of 3.5 V10s for less than one Jumbo to Asia.

10 December 2010

Another very important regulation is the introduction of driver-adjustable rear wings which will allow more overtaking because driver behind can minimize turbulence from the car in front. Another things are , the effective outlawing of double diffusers, and stricter bodywork deflection tests.

[quote elvetosnauarxos]Why not 1.0 liter 3-cylinder engines, this is even more relevant to production cars... [/quote]

...and FWD!

10 December 2010

[quote Brava] If they want to lower emissions, they should lower the number of GPs from the proposed 20 and hold them in less far off places.[/quote]

...and deprive Bernie&comp from loads of cash!? Not going to happen!

10 December 2010

1.6 litres with 4 cylinders and a maximum of 12,000 revs with a similar output to the current cars must equal a huge amount of boost pressure. Don't the current cars rev to about 18,000? 12,000 revs is about the norm for your typical 1,000cc standard road sports bike with some 600cc engines managing up to 15,000 rpm. The best BMW sports bike of 1,000cc produces about 190hp at 12,000 revs.

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