Lotus has plans to build a convertible version of the new Evora

Lotus has confirmed that it’s planning a convertible version of the new Evora just weeks after the sports car made its debut at the London motor show.

Marketing men at the British brand foresee an eight-year lifespan for the Evora, which is built alongside the Elise at Hethel in Norfolk.

A convertible version will be launched late in 2011 to boost the Evora’s appeal after three years on the market, and it’s hoped this open-top model will help Lotus maintain its sales target of 2000 units per year.

Like the Elise, the Evora’s body structure is versatile enough for other variants and even other models to be based around it. In fact, the suspension and chassis centre section will be used in the forthcoming V8-engined Esprit replacement, also scheduled for 2011.

In the shorter term, it seems likely that a more powerful version of the naturally aspirated Evora could arrive within two years, developing around 320bhp rather than the standard car’s 280bhp.

A hardcore S version also seems very likely, because the Evora’s 3.5-litre V6 engine has been cleverly packaged to leave room for a supercharger. This would be the range-topping model producing in excess of 400bhp and likely to offer Porsche 911 Turbo-rivalling levels of performance, with an estimated 0-60mph time under four seconds.

 

 

 

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Comments
4

5 August 2008

I know that Lotus is traditionally cash-strapped, but why does everything have to take so long to arrive? Especially when the design and manufacturing process lends itself to rapid product introduction. Is it because they are busy thinking of ways to make it bigger, heavier, more complex and expensive? Simplicate and add lightness gents.

Just remembered, the lightness comes later when they strip all the expensive, luxury items out and bung 25% on the price for all the clever weight reduction and 'track readiness'.

PaulJ

5 August 2008

Paul J, I don't think this is where Lotus are heading with this car. They are aiming at a more mature audience, so the car is designed to be more luxurious and heavy. I am guessing a light weight stripped out version will be inevitable at some point aka 911 GT3, but that isn't the target audience.

The reason there will be a gap in time until the drop top will be more down to marketing and keeping the image of the car "fresh". They could probably produce the convertible sooner, as you have suggested but this will possibly over expose the car in the market, shortening its life cycle. Don't forget they want to make it last for eight years, an long time in car terms.

 

 

It's all about the twisties........

5 August 2008

Sorry folks, this car is boring me. Too much flag waving and Autocar coverage for a car that's going to sell in tiny numbers. I'm sure it's going to be a great drive, but what's the point in having two useless rear seats? Just buy an Elise, and a shopping trolley with the change.

6 August 2008

[quote TegTypeR]Paul J, I don't think this is where Lotus are heading with this car. They are aiming at a more mature audience, so the car is designed to be more luxurious and heavy. I am guessing a light weight stripped out version will be inevitable at some point aka 911 GT3, but that isn't the target audience.[/quote]

I agree with your points on the whole TegTypeR, and I'm guessing that people like me fall within their intended target audience. I've owned 4 Lotuses in the past, the heaviest being a mark 1 Elise at 720kg! I'm 54 and am on my 3rd Porsche now (a Cayman S) but to me Lotus should have been busy developing the mark 3 Elise and wowing people like they did with the first in 1996. If you want to spend over £50k on a Lotus the best bet is a Mk11 or 23.

PaulJ

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